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Games: Commodore 64, Steam, OCTOPTICOM, Geneshift, RimWorld, Unreal Engine, XCOM, Robocraft, Cities: Skylines - Industries

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Gaming
  • Internet Archive launches repository of 15,000 playable Commodore 64 games

    The Commodore 64 becomes the third in-browser collection after the Commodore Amiga and a range of arcade games from LCD pocket to full cabinet were released over the last few years.

    The site uses an adaptation of the Vice emulator, compiled in Emscripten, and there are already 10,500 titles available, which the Archive confirms is a growing number. In fact, at time of writing it already seems to have exceeded 15,000.

  • The recent Steam Play beta is now out for everyone, plus a minor beta update

    If it doesn't show up for you, restart Steam. Hopefully in future the stable updates won't require this, I imagine an improved update flow will be worked on eventually although it's not much hassle to quickly restart Steam.

    Additionally, there's a very minor 3.7-8 beta available which only notes that it has "Minor compatibility fixes in preparation for future Proton versions.". While minor, the wording has piqued my interest to see what they're going to be doing.

  • Programming puzzler 'OCTOPTICOM' adds Linux support

    For those of you who love programming and puzzle games, OCTOPTICOM looks like it might actually be quite good.

  • Geneshift has expanded the Battle Royale mode to support playing with a friend

    Geneshift, the top-down shooter recently gained a Battle Royale mode that's really damn fun and the developer has continued to roll out improvements.

  • RimWorld 1.0 is going to release on October 17th next week

    After being in development for over five years, the developer has now announced the final release. They've said that the game will be save-compatible going from the most recent version as long as you haven't installed any mods. It's not going to be much different to the most recent beta, since it will largely be a bug-fix release. Although, they did mention "a new food restriction system", which lets you restrict what your colonists and any prisoners are allowed to eat.

  • Epic Games have rolled out Unreal Engine 4.21 preview, with Linux improvements

    Overall, it seems like a pretty good step up for Unreal Engine with a lot of new features, bug fixes and general code cleanups. It has improved IPv6 support, improvements to DDoS Detection and Mitigation, experimental support for the SteamVR Input subsystem, improved performance of the Unreal asset cooking process, loads of animation system updates and the list goes on and on.

  • The XCOM 2 'Tactical Legacy Pack' DLC shows how much love Firaxis has for the series and the fans

    As a long time XCOM fan, the Tactical Legacy Pack for XCOM 2 certainly feels like fan service and it's really quite good. XCOM 2 was already good, difficult as hell but engrossing. The War of the Chosen expansion released last year expanded the game in a lot of ways and it became an even better experience. This was especially true, because of all the new story elements to the game which changed the direction of it quite a lot.

    Now we have the Tactical Legacy Pack which includes new game modes, new maps, new weapons and armour and plenty more it's certainly not short on features. While not a complete game changer, it offers up enough to make it worth a purchase in my opinion. Enough to make me put down my new addiction to Rocket League for quite a number of hours, it's just that good.

  • Free to play robot battler 'Robocraft' adds a wave-based singleplayer mode

    Robocraft, the rather good free to play robot building and battling game just added a an early version of their wave-based campaign mode.

    I've tried it out and it's actually not bad at all, a pretty good way to really test your design skills against increasing waves of difficult enemies along with some more powerful boss robots.

  • Cities: Skylines - Industries expansion announced, releasing October 23rd

    Paradox have announced the Cities: Skylines - Industries expansion due for release on October 23rd and as usual the DLC will work fine on Linux.

    From the press release we got sent:

    “With this expansion, players can make more meaningful choices in their cities’ industry by managing their production chains from grain to bread.” said Sandra Neudinger, Product Manager from Paradox Interactive. “The players have been asking for an industrial expansion for a while, so we’re excited to finally offer a full featured approach.”

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  • Clear Linux Has A Goal To Get 3x More Upstream Components In Their Distro
    For those concerned that running Clear Linux means less available packages/bundles than the likes of Debian, Arch Linux, and Fedora with their immense collection of packaged software, Clear has a goal this year of increasing their upstream components available on the distribution by three times. Intel Fellow Arjan van de Ven provided an update on their bundling state/changes for the distribution. In this update he shared that the Clear Linux team at Intel established a goal this year to have "three times more upstream components in the distro. That's a steep growth, and we want to do that with some basic direction and without reducing quality/etc. We have some folks figuring out what things are the most desired that we lack, so we can add those with most priority... but this is where again we more than welcome feedback."
  • The results from our past three Linux distro polls
    You might think this annual poll would be fairly similar from year to year, from what distros we list to how people answer, but the results are wildly different from year to year. (At the time of the creation of each poll, we pull the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months.) Last year, the total votes tallied in at 15,574! And the winner was PCLinuxOS with Ubuntu a close second. Another interesting point is that in 2018, there were 950 votes for "other" and 122 comments compared to this year with only 367 votes for "other" and 69 comments.
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 3: What does this mean for Fedora releases?
    Fedora operating system releases are (largely) time-based activity where a new base operating system (kernel, libraries, compilers) is built and tested against our Editions for functionality. This provides a new source for solutions to be built on. The base operating systems may continue to be maintained on the current 13 month life cycle — or services that extend that period may be provided in the future. A solution is never obligated to build against all currently maintained bases.
  • How open data and tools can save lives during a disaster
    If you've lived through a major, natural disaster, you know that during the first few days you'll probably have to rely on a mental map, instead of using a smartphone as an extension of your brain. Where's the closest hospital with disaster care? What about shelters? Gas stations? And how many soft story buildings—with their propensity to collapse—will you have to zig-zag around to get there? Trying to answer these questions after moving back to earthquake-prone San Francisco is why I started the Resiliency Maps project. The idea is to store information about assets, resources, and hazards in a given geographical area in a map that you can download and print out. The project contributes to and is powered by OpenStreetMap (OSM), and the project's entire toolkit is open source, ensuring that the maps will be available to anyone who wants to use them.
  • Millions of websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal

    Drupal is the third most-widely used CMS behind WordPress and Joomla. With an estimated 3 percent to 4 percent of the world's billion-plus websites, that means Drupal runs tens of millions of sites. Critical flaws in any CMS are popular with hackers, because the vulnerabilities can be unleashed against large numbers of sites with a single, often-easy-to-write script.

  • Avoiding the coming IoT dystopia
    Bradley Kuhn works for the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and part of what that organization does is to think about the problems that software freedom may encounter in the future. SFC worries about what will happen with the four freedoms as things change in the world. One of those changes is already upon us: the Internet of Things (IoT) has become quite popular, but it has many dangers, he said. Copyleft can help; his talk is meant to show how. It is still an open question in his mind whether the IoT is beneficial or not. But the "deep trouble" that we are in from IoT can be mitigated to some extent by copyleft licenses that are "regularly and fairly enforced". Copyleft is not the solution to all of the problems, all of the time—no idea, no matter how great, can be—but it can help with the dangers of IoT. That is what he hoped to convince attendees with his talk. A joke that he had seen at least three times at the conference (and certainly before that as well) is that the "S" in IoT stands for security. As everyone knows by now, the IoT is not about security. He pointed to some recent incidents, including IoT baby monitors that were compromised by attackers in order to verbally threaten the parents. This is "scary stuff", he said.