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Plex Media Server Is Now Available as a Snap App for Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

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Ubuntu

Already available as binary packages for Debian- and Red Hat-based operating systems using the DEB and RPM package format, the Plex Media Server over-the-top (OTT) media service used by millions worldwide is now easier to install across a multitude of GNU/Linux distributions as a Snap app from Canonical's Snap Store.

"The biggest appeal of Snaps is the simple installation mechanism," said Tamas Szelei, Software Engineer at Plex. "Canonical's Snap Store provides an easy and secure way to distribute our software to an increasing number of consumers. What's more, Snaps help cater to the more technical Plex user, who benefits from confined applications and the added sense of software security."

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The Easy Way to Install Plex Media Server on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

  • The Easy Way to Install Plex Media Server on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Binge watchers, TV addicts, and music lovers rejoice — it just got mighty easy to install Plex Media Server on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and other Linux distributions, all thanks to Snaps!

    From today Plex is available to install from the Snap store, for free, on any and all Linux distros that support the Snap framework, such as Linux Mint, Solus and Manjaro.

Canonical Announces Plex as a Snap

Plex for Linux now available as a Snap

  • Plex for Linux now available as a Snap

    Microsoft is having a terrible time lately. Sometimes it feels like the company wants to sabotage itself. The most recent debacle is its flagship product -- Windows 10 -- deleting user files. Even worse, the company ignored user feedback that it was happening! Quite frankly, after such a scary thing, I am not sure how people can trust Microsoft's operating system with important data.

    Thankfully, you do not have to use Windows. These days, it is easier than ever to use Linux instead. There are plenty of great apps available for operating systems like Ubuntu, Fedora, and more. Canonical's containerized Snap packaging makes it even simpler to both install Linux apps and keep them updated. Today, a very popular app, Plex Media Server, gets the Snap treatment. In other words, you can install the media server program without any headaches -- right from the Snap store!

Plex media streaming platform is now available as snap on Linux

  • Plex media streaming platform is now available as a snap on Linux

    Canonical has announced that Plex, the media streaming platform, is now available as a snap package which means that it is easy to install and update on most Linux distributions which support snap packages including Ubuntu. By bundling Plex as a snap, the developers of the software can bundle any dependencies and push updates automatically ensuring users are always on the latest version.

Plex virtualises its way on to Linux as a Canonical Snap

  • Plex virtualises its way on to Linux as a Canonical Snap

    STREAMING YOUR favourite shows with Linux just got a lot easier after Canonical announced Plex as a Snap.

    The popular platform allows users to combine their own files with streamed ones from a series of channels has been available in a variety of formats, but the arrival of a universal (almost) Linux version will open up a system that goes beyond their desktop, thanks to the server aspect, which will make media accessible from anywhere.

    Additionally, with the right hardware, it can be turned into a DVR.

    "When it comes to media, today's consumers want instant access and choice without the fuss. Plex is the ideal platform to cater to their needs, and we're thrilled to welcome them to the Snaps ecosystem", said Jamie Bennett, VP of Engineering, Devices & IoT at Canonical.

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