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Control Flow Integrity in the Android kernel

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Android

Android's security model is enforced by the Linux kernel, which makes it a tempting target for attackers. We have put a lot of effort into hardening the kernel in previous Android releases and in Android 9, we continued this work by focusing on compiler-based security mitigations against code reuse attacks.

Google's Pixel 3 will be the first Android device to ship with LLVM's forward-edge Control Flow Integrity (CFI) enforcement in the kernel, and we have made CFI support available in Android kernel versions 4.9 and 4.14. This post describes how kernel CFI works and provides solutions to the most common issues developers might run into when enabling the feature.

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More in Tux Machines

Uber brings Horovod project for distributed deep learning to Linux Foundation

Uber today brought Horovod, a framework for distributed training across multiple machines, to open source initiative LF Deep Learning Foundation. Uber has used Horovod to support self-driving vehicles, fraud detection, and trip forecasting. Contributors to the project include Amazon, IBM, Intel, and Nvidia. In addition to Uber, Alibaba, Amazon, and Nvidia also use Horovod. The Horovod project can be used with popular frameworks like TensorFlow, Keras, and PyTorch. Read more Also: LF Deep Learning Welcomes Horovod Distributed Training Framework as Newest Project

today's howtos

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We need Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities

The short version: we should stop focusing on how to protect the revenue models of open source companies, and instead focus on how to create sustainable communities. Both because it leads to better software, but also because it’s better for business. Today I’m launching the Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities (SFOSC) project. It’s a place to discuss what the principles are that lead to sustainable communities, to develop clear social contracts communities can use, and educate Open Source companies on which business models can create true communities. I also wrote a short book on why I think this is important, and the research that went in to the development of the principles themselves. Read more