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today's leftovers

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  • Add It Up: FaaS ≠ Serverless

    Using FaaS for isolated use cases or playing with it test environments does not require an organization to rethink the way it writes code or manages infrastructure. But, without re-factoring an application, FaaS can easily increase computing costs when scaled for production use. With many other challenges arising when FaaS moves into production, it is not surprising that almost all organizations with broad deployments are using unique architectures for serverless applications.

  • Cleaning up the Cruft in KDE’s Bugzilla

    We know this is a problem, and some steps have been taken recently to attempt to reduce this. Not long ago, Nate Graham proposed a cleanup of our plasma4 product, which closed 4,000+ bugs. Most of the bugs there were very old and no longer relevant, due to the introduction of Plasma 5 four years ago. While that was a good step in the right direction, we have many, many more products.

  • Usability testing with Outreachy

    I've volunteered with Allan and Jakub to mentor more GNOME usability testing in the next cycle of Outreachy, from December 4, 2018 to March 4, 2019. Outreachy expressly invites applicants from around the world who are women (both cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people.

    Interns will work with the GNOME team and mentor(s) to do usability testing on GNOME. The goal is to perform several cycles of usability testing on prototypes of new designs, and provide usability testing results and feedback to the GNOME team so a new iterative design can be updated based on those results. We would like to use a "test what you've got" approach where we set up a testing schedule, and the intern tests whatever prototype or model is ready at that time. So if "test day" is Thursday, we could nail down what to test by Monday, and have the intern post results on Friday or the weekend.

  • The ASUS ROG Phone Wants To Be Your Game Console And PC, Too

    This massively powerful Android phone was announced way back in June, but it’s going up for pre-order in the US on October 18th. The $900 price tag sounds ridiculous, or at least it would have a couple of years ago, before Apple, Google, and Samsung decided that the ceiling on phone prices was more like a stratosphere. If you’re wondering, “ROG” stands for “Republic of Gamers,” ASUS’ dedicated gaming sub-brand a la Dell’s Alienware.

  • The Next Essential Phone Will Be AI Powered, Smart Enough To Email, Book Appointments And Text

More in Tux Machines

Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure. If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat. Read more

KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software. However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy. Read more Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Android Leftovers

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store. Read more