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Security: WhatsApp, Flatpak and DNS

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Security
  • Hackers Can Take Control Of Your WhatsApp Just With A Video Call: Update Now

    Natalie Silvanovich, a Google Project Zero security researcher, has uncovered a critical security flaw in WhatsApp. The flaw could allow a notorious actor to make a video call and take complete control of your messaging application.

  • Just Answering A Video Call Could Compromise Your WhatsApp Account
  • New Website Claims Flatpak is a “Security Nightmare”

    A newly launched website is warning users about Flatpak, branding the tech a “security nightmare”.

    The ‘Flatkills.org’ web page takes aim at a number of security claims routinely associated with the fledgling Flatpak app packaging and distribution format.

  • DNS Security Still an Issue

    DNS security is a decades-old issue that shows no signs of being fully resolved. Here's a quick overview of some of the problems with proposed solutions and the best way to move forward.

    ...After many years of availability, DNSSEC has yet to attain significant adoption, even though any security expert you might ask recognizes its value. As with any public key infrastructure, DNSSEC is complicated. You must follow a lot of rules carefully, although some network services providers are trying to make things easier.

    But DNSSEC does not encrypt the communications between the DNS client and server. Using the information in your DNS requests, an attacker between you and your DNS server could determine which sites you are attempting to communicate with just by reading packets on the network.

    So despite best efforts of various Internet groups, DNS remains insecure. Too many roadblocks exist that prevent the Internet-wide adoption of a DNS security solution. But it is time to revisit the concerns.

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