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A Look At Linux Application Scaling Up To 128 Threads

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Arriving last week in our Linux benchmarking lab was a dual EPYC server -- this Dell PowerEdge R7425 is a beast of a system with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors yielding a combined 64 cores / 128 threads, 512GB of RAM (16 x 32GB DDR4), and 20 x 500GB Samsung 860 EVO SSDs. There will be many interesting benchmarks from this server in the days and weeks ahead. For some initial measurements during the first few days of stress testing this 2U rack server, here is a look at how well various benchmarks/applications are scaling from two to 128 threads.

This article with these benchmarks is mainly intended for reference purposes for those curious how well different Linux workloads scale up to 128 threads with these multi-core benchmarks available via the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org. Tests were done with 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 cores enabled and then the default configuration of 64 threads plus SMT to yield 128 threads of jaw-dropping power.

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