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Plasma 5.14 Comes with New Features and a Much Polished Environment

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KDE

Tuesday, 9 October 2018. Today KDE launches the first release of Plasma 5.14.

Plasma is KDE's lightweight and full featured Linux desktop. For the last three months we have been adding features and fixing bugs and now invite you to install Plasma 5.14.

A lot of work has gone into improving Discover, Plasma's software manager, and, among other things, we have added a Firmware Update feature and many subtle user interface improvements to give it a smoother feel. We have also rewritten many effects in our window manager KWin and improved it for slicker animations in your work day. Other improvements we have made include a new Display Configuration widget which is useful when giving presentations.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

KDE Plasma 5.14 Released With A Plethora Of Improvements

KDE Plasma 5.14 Released

  • KDE Plasma 5.14 Released: What’s New In The Popular Linux Desktop

    Plasma is one of the most popular Linux desktop environments around; it’s loved by new open source enthusiasts and veterans alike. To bring a fresh and updated experience to the users, the KDE Project keeps bringing newer versions of the Plasma desktop from time to time.

    The latest Plasma release 5.14.0 has just been pushed and it brings obvious bug fixes and new features. So, let’s tell you about them in brief.

    For Plasma 5.14, the developers have worked a lot to improve Discover — Plasma’s software manager and add-on installer. With the new fwupd support, you can now use it to update your PC’s firmware.

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