Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Today's Red Hat Series on Programming/Development

Filed under
Development
  • 4 best practices for giving open source code feedback

    In the previous article I gave you tips for how to receive feedback, especially in the context of your first free and open source project contribution. Now it's time to talk about the other side of that same coin: providing feedback.

    If I tell you that something you did in your contribution is "stupid" or "naive," how would you feel? You'd probably be angry, hurt, or both, and rightfully so. These are mean-spirited words that when directed at people, can cut like knives. Words matter, and they matter a great deal. Therefore, put as much thought into the words you use when leaving feedback for a contribution as you do into any other form of contribution you give to the project. As you compose your feedback, think to yourself, "How would I feel if someone said this to me? Is there some way someone might take this another way, a less helpful way?" If the answer to that last question has even the chance of being a yes, backtrack and rewrite your feedback. It's better to spend a little time rewriting now than to spend a lot of time apologizing later.

  • 6 tips for receiving feedback on your open source contributions

    In the free and open source software world, there are few moments as exciting or scary as submitting your first contribution to a project. You've put your work out there and now it's subject to review and feedback by the rest of the community.

    Not to put it too lightly, but feedback is great. Without feedback we keep making the same mistakes. Without feedback we can't learn and grow and evolve. It's one of the keys that makes free and open source collaboration work.

  • What was your first open source pull request or contribution?

    Contributing to an open source project can be... Nervewracking! Magical. Boring?

    Regardless of how you felt that first time you contributed, the realization that the project is open and you really can contribute is quite awesome.

  • Stop hiring for culture fit: 4 ways to get the talent you want

    If you're looking for talented people you can turn into cultural doppelgängers—rather than seeking to align productive differences toward a common goal—you're doing it wrong.

  • Who was the first computer programmer?

    Ada Lovelace, daughter of the English poet Lord Bryon and Anne Isabella Noel Byron (née Milbanke), was arguably the world's first computer programmer. Her notes on Babbage's Analytical Engine, published as additions to her translation of Luigi Menabrea's Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage contain an algorithm for computing Bernoulli numbers.

    Some biographers downplay, or outright dismiss, Ada Lovelace's contributions to computing, but James Essinger, author of "Ada's Algorithm: How Lord Byron's Daughter Ada Lovelace Launched the Digital Age" is a firm supporter of Lovelace's place in the history of computing.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Strange Loop Games and City Builder

Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port in mid 2019

As it can be seen in the first graph, perhaps with some difficulty, is that the percent of arch-dependent packages built for riscv64 (grey line) has been around or higher than 80% since mid 2018, just a few months after the port was added to the infrastructure. Given than the arch-dependent packages are about half of the Debian['s main, unstable] archive and that (in simple terms) arch-independent packages can be used by all ports (provided that the software that they rely on is present, e.g. a programming language interpreter), this means that around 90% of packages of the whole archive has been available for this architecture from early on. Read more

Latest Security FUD

Software: Synapse, Qmmp and LibreOffice

  • How to install and use Synapse, the MacOS Spotlight alternative for Linux
    Mac OS is everybody’s favorite, and there are several reasons behind it. One of the most useful utilities you can find on Mac OS is Spotlight, which makes searching for things a piece of cake, all directly from the desktop. While most developers have already designed similar utilities for Windows, the open-source Linux based operating systems are no exception, as well. Most Linux operating systems like Ubuntu have its own search functionality, but it can sometimes be troublesome to reach there and isn’t as powerful as Spotlight. So with Synapse for Linux, you can do just that, and boost the power of the search functionality on your system. With Synapse for Ubuntu, you can even search for things on the web, which is cool, as well. Some Linux distros like Lubuntu, don’t offer decent search functionality, and Synapse can be a great solution in such cases. With Synapse, searching is easy with just the navigation buttons on your keyboard, and you are ready to go. Synapse can be downloaded and installed from the Linux official repository. Synapse can also be configured to run on startup so that too don’t need to search for, and open Synapse, each time you need to use it.
  • Qmmp 1.3.3 Released with Floating PulseAudio, ALSA, OSS4 Support
    Qmmp, Qt based audio player, released version 1.3.3 with improvements and bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 19.04.
  • Office Suites for Ubuntu 18.04
    Today we are looking at different office suites for Ubuntu 18.04. LibreOffice is the default LibreOffice suite for Ubuntu but it is by all means not the only one. In this article, we will look at different office suites for Ubuntu and all of its pros and cons. All these Office Suites are available for at least all Ubuntu based distros, and the installation method is the same for all the Ubuntu based distros.
  • Week 3 Report
    I continue working on Rewriting the logger messages with the new DSL grammar: