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​Redis Labs and Common Clause attacked where it hurts: With open-source code

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After Redis Labs added a new license clause, Commons Clause, on top of popular open-source, in-memory data structure store Redis, open-source developers were mad as hell. Now, instead of just ranting about it, some have counterattacked by starting a project, GoodFORM, to fork the code in question.

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New Open-Source GoodFORM Project

  • New Open-Source GoodFORM Project, Made by Google 2018 Event Today, Asus Chromebook C423, HP Chromebook x360 14 and KDE Launches Plasma 5.14

    Redis labs recently added the Commons Clause on top of the Redis open-source, in-memory data structure store, and now open-source developers are forking the code in a new project called GoodFORM. ZDNet quotes Debian project leader Chris Lamb and Fedora developer Nathan Scott's explanation for the need to fork the code: "With the recent licensing changes to several Redis Labs modules making them no longer free and open source, GNU/Linux distributions such as Debian and Fedora are no longer able to ship Redis Labs' versions of the affected modules to their users."

Redis Labs and the "Common Clause"

  • Redis Labs and the "Common Clause"

    So, the short version is that with the recent licensing changes to several Redis Labs modules making them no longer free and open source, GNU/Linux distributions, such as Debian and Fedora, are no longer able to ship Redis Labs' versions of the affected modules to their users.

    As a result, we have begun working together to create a set of module repositories forked from prior to the license change. We will maintain changes to these modules under their original open source licenses, applying only free and open fixes and updates.

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