Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software and HowTos: Rancher, Laverna, gtop, Manuals, KeeWeb and More

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Rancher Takes on Multicloud Kubernetes Management

    One thing that happens over time is that organizations can end up with multiple deployments in different places, something that is commonly referred to as - multicloud. It's a deployment challenge that Rancher Labs has built it namesake Rancher cloud orchestration platform to help enable.

    [...]

    With the multicloud world, Williams said its critically important to put in place all of the policy and user management that is needed to have a consistent approach across disparate Kubernetes deployments.

    Rancher is now and has always been open source software that is entirely free for any organization to use. Rancher Labs charges for commercial support, which Williams said is a stable and growing business. He said that Rancher Labs has both outbound sales people as well as channel relationships and today has over 200 customers.

    "But that's a pretty small percentage of the total of 10,000 companies use Rancher everyday to run their containers," he said.

    Williams said that Rancher is Kubernetes, with Docker containers and a management plane and it's something that larger organizations really care about once those services are in production.

  • Taking notes with Laverna, a web-based information organizer

    I don’t know anyone who doesn’t take notes. Most of the people I know use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep.

    All of those are good tools, but they’re proprietary. And you have to wonder about the privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote’s great privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you need to turn to an open source tool—preferably one that you can host yourself.

    And there are a number of good open source alternatives to Evernote. One of these is Laverna. Let’s take a look at it.

  • Essential System Tools: gtop – System monitoring dashboard for the terminal

    This is the second in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities.

    We previously covered ps_mem, a really useful memory utility. This time, another console utility is under the spotlight. It’s called gtop.

    gtop is an open source system monitoring utility written in JavaScript. Our Group Test covered alternatives to top. In particular, htop is a remarkable system monitoring tool. gtop receives far less exposure than htop, but deserves more publicity. Why? Let’s see.

  • Good Alternatives To Man Pages Every Linux User Needs To Know

    A man page, acronym of manual page, is a software documentation found in all Unix-like operating systems. Some man pages are short; some are comprehensive. A man page is divided into several parts, organized  with headings for each section, such as NAME, SYNOPSIS, CONFIGURATION, DESCRIPTION, OPTIONS, EXIT STATUS, RETURN VALUE, ERRORS, ENVIRONMENT, FILES, VERSIONS, CONFORMING TO, NOTES, BUGS, EXAMPLE, AUTHORS, and SEE ALSO.

    Sometimes, I find it really time-consuming when I wanted to learn a practical example of a given Unix command using man pages. So, I started to look for some good alternatives to man pages which are focused on mostly examples, skipping all other comprehensive text parts. Thankfully, there are some really good alternatives out there. In this tutorial, we will be discussing 4 alternatives to man pages for Unix-like operating systems.

  • KeeWeb – An Open Source, Cross Platform Password Manager

    If you’ve been using the internet for any amount of time, chances are, you have a lot of accounts on a lot of websites. All of those accounts must have passwords, and you have to remember all those passwords. Either that, or write them down somewhere. Writing down passwords on paper may not be secure, and remembering them won’t be practically possible if you have more than a few passwords. This is why Password Managers have exploded in popularity in the last few years. A password Manager is like a central repository where you store all your passwords for all your accounts, and you lock it with a master password. With this approach, the only thing you need to remember is the Master password.

  • Plasma secrets: Make the desktop remember window position
  • Create a role on the Chef server with a description
  • Cat Command in Linux: Essential and Advanced Examples
  • Fix ‘add-apt-repository command not found’ Error on Ubuntu and Debian
  • How to Customize SSH Settings For Maximum Security
  • Python at the pump: A script for filling your gas tank
  • Linux vdir Command Tutorial for Beginners (8 Examples)
  • Free eBook from Packt - Linux Shell Scripting Cookbook - Third Edition

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Intel Core i9 9900K vs. AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Complementing the just-published Intel Core i9 9900K Linux benchmarks with the launch-day embargo lift are the Linux gaming benchmarks... This article is looking at the Linux performance between the Core i9 9900K and AMD's Ryzen 7 2700X in a variety of native Linux games as well as comparing the performance-per-Watt. So if you are a Linux gamer and deciding between these sub-$500 processors, this article is for you. If you didn't yet read the main article that features a 15-way CPU comparison on Ubuntu 18.10 with the Linux 4.19 kernel, here is a recap of this new Coffeelake refresh CPU. The Core i9 9900K is an eight-core / sixteen-thread processor with 3.6GHz base frequency and 5.0GHz turbo frequency. This 14nm CPU has a 16MB L3 cache, dual channel DDR4-2666 support, and a 95 Watt TDP. There is also the onboard UHD Graphics 630, but if you're a gamer, that isn't going to cut it. The Core i9 9900K is launching at $499 USD. Read more

Intel Core i9 9900K Linux Benchmarks - 15-Way Intel/AMD Comparison On Ubuntu 18.10

Intel sent over the Core i9 9900K as their first 9th Gen Coffeelake-S CPU hitting store shelves today. With the embargo on that now expired, let's have a look at how well this eight-core / sixteen-thread processor performs under Linux. The Core i9 9900K is Intel's new answer for competing with the likes of the AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, but does come at a higher price point of $499 USD. While the Core i9 9900K is a Coffeelake refresh, rather than being six cores / twelve threads, they are matching AMD's precedent set by the Ryzen 7 processors in having eight cores / sixteen threads. This 14nm 8C / 16T processor has a base clock frequency of 3.6GHz with a turbo frequency at 5.0GHz, a 16MB L3 cache and supports dual-channel DDR4-2666 memory. Read more

Google: Desktop, Server and Kernel

  • Chrome OS Linux support to gain folder sharing, Google Drive, more
    Chrome OS has been shaping up to be the all-in-one system, combining the best of Google’s ecosystem, including Android apps, with the power of Linux apps. The latter is still in beta phase with improvements and new features in every update. Today we take a look at some of the features coming soon to Chrome OS Linux apps. Chrome OS first gained its Linux app support, also known as Crostini, with version 69. While it’s certainly not flawless, the support has been groundbreaking, enabling everything from full photo editors to Android Studio on Chrome OS. With upcoming versions of Chrome OS, Google is working to smoothen the rough edges of Crostini to make it easier to use.
  • Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens on using open source for competitive advantage in the public cloud
    As all three continue to vie for the affections of CIOs, how they market their respective public cloud propositions to enterprise IT buyers has subtly shifted over time. For evidence of this, one only has to look at how little fuss the big three now make about rolling out price cuts for their services compared to several years ago, when one provider announcing a price drop would not only make headlines, but prompt its competitors to publicly follow suit too. This in itself is indicative of the fact enterprises expect more from providers than just access to cheap commodity IT services these days, and that ongoing cost reductions are simply an accepted part of using cloud, Google Cloud CTO Brian Stevens, tells Computer Weekly.
  • KUnit: A new unit testing framework for Linux Kernel
    On Tuesday, Google engineer Brendan Higgins announced an experimental set of 31 patches by introducing KUnit as a new Linux kernel unit testing framework to help preserve and improve the quality of the kernel’s code. KUnit is a lightweight unit testing and mocking framework designed for the Linux kernel. Unit tests necessarily have finer granularity, they are able to test all code paths easily solving the classic problem of difficulty in exercising error handling code.