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Apple Wipes

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More on Apple

Apple Blocking Third-Party Repairs On New MacBook Pros

  • Apple Blocking Third-Party Repairs On New MacBook Pros With Diagnostics Software

    Apple is using new proprietary software diagnostic tools that make it harder to conduct third-party repairs on iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro.

    This software ensures that if a device undergoes key part repairs from an unauthorized service provider, it will result in an “inoperative system and an incomplete repair.”

Apple Admits It Got Cracked

  • Facebook And Apple Confirm Their Servers Were Hit By Chinese Malware

    In a bombshell report earlier this week, Bloomberg revealed that tiny spy chips were planted on Apple and Amazon’s servers by Chinese spies. And yesterday, we saw official responses from the company strongly denying the occurrence of such an incident. The servers in question were made by Supermicro.

    Now the latest report tells us that some of those servers were also infiltrated with malware. Both Apple and Facebook have confirmed this fact. However, let me clarify that this malware attack doesn’t mention any involvement of an alleged spy chip.

    Facebook says that it found the compromised servers in 2015 and the malware was present on “a limited number of Supermicro hardware” that was used only “for testing purposes confined to our labs.”

  • The Big Hack: The Software Side of China’s Supply Chain Attack

    Even as Amazon, Apple, and U.S. officials were investigating malicious microchips embedded in Supermicro server motherboards, Supermicro was the target of at least two other possible forms of attack, people familiar with multiple corporate probes say.

    The first of the other two prongs involved a Supermicro online portal that customers used to get critical software updates, and that was breached by China-based attackers in 2015. The problem, which was never made public, was identified after at least two Supermicro customers downloaded firmware—software installed in hardware components—meant to update their motherboards’ network cards, key components that control communications between servers running in a data center. The code had been altered, allowing the attackers to secretly take over a server’s communications, according to samples passed around at the time among a small group of Supermicro customers. One of these customers was Facebook Inc.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more

Leftovers: Linux in the Ham Shack and Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

  • LHS Episode #264: The Weekender XXI
    Welcome to the 21st Weekender episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. This time around, we talk about the few contests and special event stations that are around for December. We also touch on Linux distros to try, things to do in the amateur radio and open source world and then we dive straight into hedonism, discussing good food, good music and good spirits. Thank you for listening and Happy Holidays.
  • The Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending
    Apple’s premier gadget faces a less certain future than ever as the market shifts under its feet.