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today's leftovers

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  • PulseAudio Lands Big Improvements For Its Meson Build System

    PulseAudio has been slower than some of the other prominent open-source projects at moving to the Meson build system, but as of last night it appears a bulk of that new build system is in place.

    Back in June is when some initial bits of the Meson build system were merged to the PulseAudio sound server code base and then a few commits here and there pertaining to this Autotools alternative.

  • This week focuses on Slackware 14.2 packages

    The admins over there at slackbuilds.org have updated their version of the Qt5 build script (targeting Slackware 14.2) to 5.9.6, i.e. the latest version of the Long Term Support (LTS) for Qt5.

    That triggered me to provide the same service for my own package repository targeting Slackware 14.2. Since more and more software is depending on Qt5, a lot of people will have some qt5 package installed, either built from the SBo script or installed from my repository. In order to minimize breakage, I think it is good if SBo’s and mine are the same version so that it should not matter which one you have installed.

    So, I did a chained upgrade: libwacom (0.31), libinput (1.7.3), libxkbcommon (0.8.2), qt5 (5.9.6) and qt5-webkit (5.9.1) in that order to take care of dependencies. The latest releases of these packages are now available for Slackware 14.2. Note that for the 32bit Slackware 14.2, the libwacom package is a new dependency for both libinput and qt5. My repository contained a pretty old 32bit qt5 package (5.7.0) which was not built against libwacom.

  • What is agile?

    I know you are thinking, "Not another Agile 101 article!" We were, too. There are many resources that describe what agile is, talk about the history of the concept, and go into depth about why it is important. This article is not any of those things—rather, we would like you to forget everything you've been told; everything you've learned, read, or otherwise acquired via misuse of the term or misdeed in implementing it.

  • Stocks with Performance Valuation Turns Game Changers- Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Old Ceiling Or A New Floor? Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Stumbles, Yet Again
  • What we learned building a Zuul CI/CD cloud

    Contributing to open source projects such as OpenStack traditionally involves individuals and companies providing code contributions that add new features and fix bugs. For nearly two years, I’ve been running one-off OpenStack clouds for demonstrations and labs at user group meetings across the US, using hardware donated from bare-metal service provider Packet. Six months ago, Packet asked how they could make a larger donation to the community, which brought us on our path to build a community cloud to support OpenStack.

    Each day, hundreds of code commits to the OpenStack code base need to be tested as part of the continuous integration system managed by Zuul, "a program that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects." Each commit runs through a series of tests (or gates) before a human review, and the gates run again before a code merge. All of these gates run across a pool of virtual machines instances (more than 900 instances at peak times) donated by a number of public cloud providers. All of the OpenStack CI is dependent on donated computing resources. The OpenStack Infra team coordinates all of these cloud providers and served as our point of contact for donating these resources.

  • UN Panel Starts Consultations On Digital Cooperation: Philosophy and Practice

    There is a lot of energy and good dynamism, and some worries, too, about the immensity of the task ahead in the United Nations High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, Jovan Kurbalija, executive director of Panel’s Secretariat, said after the first face-to-face meeting last week and subsequent virtual town hall on 1 October. According to the mandate, the panel shall in less than a year present recommendations on ways and means for cooperation on digital policies and digital risks.

  • Icestorm Tools Roundup: Open Source FPGA Dev Guide

    We like the ICE40 FPGA from Lattice for two reasons: there are cheap development boards like the Icestick available for it and there are open source tools. We’ve based several tutorials on the Icestorm toolchain and it works quite well. However, the open source tools don’t always expose everything that you see from commercial tools. You sometimes have to dig a little to find the right tool or option.

    Sometimes that’s a good thing. I don’t need to learn yet another fancy IDE and we have plenty of good simulation tools, so why reinvent the wheel? However, if you are only using the basic workflow of Yosys, Arachne-pnr, icepack, and iceprog, you could be missing out on some of the most interesting features. Let’s take a deeper look.

  • Thank you for participating in International Day Against DRM 2018!

    Thank you everyone for helping to make September 18th another successful International Day Against DRM (IDAD)! Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) is an issue we have to face every day. In rallying together for a single day against DRM, we sent a powerful message: DRM is just wrong and we can live in a society without it.

    Hundreds of you around the world took action on IDAD: going out into your campuses, communities, and around the Web, and sharing your opposition to how DRM restricts your freedom as a user of software and media. The 17 participating organizations took their own actions, creating videos, releasing reports, and writing articles. Here in Boston, we visited the Apple Store and talked with shoppers about their digital rights and how Apple devices abuse those rights using DRM.

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today's leftovers

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)
    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented. Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that. However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.
  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek
    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.
  • Load-Bearing Internet People
    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.
  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture
    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this. In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find. Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations. The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

OSS Leftovers

  • Letter of Recommendation: Bug Fixes
    I wouldn’t expect a nonprogrammer to understand the above, but you can intuit some of what’s going on: that we don’t need ImageMagick to scale images anymore, because the text editor can scale images on its own; that it’s bad form to spell-check hex values, which specify colors; that the bell is doing something peculiar if someone holds down the alt key; and so forth. But there’s also something larger, more gladdening, about reading bug fixes. My text editor, Emacs, is a free software project with a history going back more than 40 years; the codebase itself starts in the 1980s, and as I write this there are 136,586 different commits that get you from then to now. More than 600 contributors have worked on it. I find those numbers magical: A huge, complex system that edits all kinds of files started from nothing and then, with nearly 140,000 documented human actions, arrived at its current state. It has leaders but no owner, and it will move along the path in which people take it. It’s the ship of Theseus in code form. I’ve probably used Emacs every day for more than two decades. It has changed me, too. It will outlive me. Open source is a movement, and even the charitably inclined would call it an extreme brofest. So there’s drama. People fight it out in comments, over everything from semicolons to codes of conduct. But in the end, the software works or it doesn’t. Politics, our personal health, our careers or lives in general — these do not provide a narrative of unalloyed progress. But software, dammit, can and does. It’s a pleasure to watch the code change and improve, and it’s also fascinating to see big companies, paid programmers and volunteers learning to work together (the Defense Department is way into open source) to make those changes and improvements. I read the change logs, and I think: Humans can do things.
  • The Top 17 Free and Open Source Network Monitoring Tools
    Choosing the right network monitoring solution for your enterprise is not easy.
  • Hedge-fund managers are overwhelmed by data, and they're turning to an unlikely source: random people on the internet
    Alternative data streams of satellite images and cellphone-location data are where managers are now digging for alpha, as new datasets are created every day. And hedge funds have been spending serious cash searching for those who can take all this information and quickly find the important pieces. Now, as margins shrink and returns are under the microscope, hedge funds are beginning to consider a cheaper, potentially more efficient way to crunch all this data: open-source platforms, where hundreds of thousands of people ranging from finance professionals to students, scientists, and developers worldwide scour datasets — and don't get paid unless they find something that a fund finds useful.
  • TD Ameritrade Is Taking Its First Steps Towards Major Open Source Contributions
    STUMPY is a python library to identify the patterns and anomalies in time series data. STUMPY has benefited from open source as a means to shorten development roadmaps since the early 2000s and it represents a new opportunity for TD Ameritrade to give back to the developer community.
  • The Future of Open Source Big Data Platforms
    Three well-funded startups – Cloudera Inc., Hortonworks Inc., and MapR Technologies Inc. — emerged a decade ago to commercialize products and services in the open-source ecosystem around Hadoop, a popular software framework for processing huge amounts of data. The hype peaked in early 2014 when Cloudera raised a massive $900 million funding round, valuing it at $4.1 billion.
  • No Easy Way Forward For Commercial Open Source Software Vendors
    While still a student in 1995, Kimball developed the first version of GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) as a class project, along with Peter Mattis. Later on as a Google engineer, he worked on a new version of the Google File System, and the Google Servlet Engine. In 2012, Kimball, Mattis, and Brian McGinnis launched the company Viewfinder, later selling it to Square.
  • 6 Reasons Why Developers Should Contribute More To Open Source
    Even by fixing minor things like a bug in a library or writing a piece of documentation can also help the developers to write readable or maintainable code. They can independently suggest to the community and generally tend to stick by the rules of writing a code that is easy to understand. The fact that the code will be exposed to everyone naturally makes them write focus on making it readable.
  • WIDE Project, KDDI develop router with open-source software, 3.2T-packet transmission
    The WIDE Project has adopted a router developed by Japanese operator KDDI. The router runs open-source software, and will be used with the networks operated and managed by the WIDE Project. The router will use open-source software with up to 3.2T-packet transmission. For this project, KDDI plans to start tests this month to verify the practical utility and interoperability of these routers when put to use in the actual service environment. The WIDE Project will be in charge of network administration and definition of requirements for router implementation.
  • Lack of progress in open source adoption hindering global custody’s digitisation
    Custody industry is lagging behind the rest of the financial services sector for open source projects, according to industry experts.
  • TNF: Industry should be focusing on open source development
    According to O'Shea, open source and the community are helping firms to find and attract experienced technology talent “uber engineers”.
  • Google Open Sources TensorNetwork , A Library For Faster ML And Physics Tasks
    “Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas – e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning and economics–because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses,” said the AI maverick Marvin Minsky four decades ago. Mathematics as a tool to interpret nature’s most confounding problems from molecular biology to quantum mechanics has so far been successful. Though there aren’t any complete answers to these problems, the techniques within domain help throw some light on the obscure corners of reality.
  • Open source to become a ‘best practice’
    There are many magic rings in this world… and none of them should be used lightly. This is true. It is also true that organisations in every vertical are now having to work hard and find automation streams that they can digitise (on the road to *yawn* digital transformation, obviously) and start to apply AI and machine learning to. Another key truth lies in the amount of codified best practices that organisations now have the opportunity to lay down. One we can denote a particular set of workflows in a particular department (or team, or group, or any other collective) to be deemed to be as efficient as possible, then we can lay that process down as a best practice.
  • 10 Open-Source and Free CAD Software You Can Download Right Now
    Many CAD software products exist today for anyone interested in 2D or 3D designing. From browser tools to open-source programs, the market is full of free options available for hobbyists or small companies just starting out.

How to Send Emails From Linux Terminal

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