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Krita, KDE Contributions, Debian Contributions and Debian Leftovers

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KDE
Debian
  • [Krita] Interview with João Garcia

    My name is João Garcia and I’m an illustrator hailing from Brazil, more specifically, from the city of Florianópolis in the southern part of the country. I graduated in Design in the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina with a focus on illustration and animation.

  • [Krita] Updated Vote Tally!

    This week, we also plan to bring out a preview release of Krita 4.2. We don’t have everything in that we want to yet — like the updated resource handling, but there’s already plenty to play with!

  • FOSS Contributions Log: August/September 2018

    This post will be related not only to the last month (September), but I have decided to include my experiences from August as well. In the last month, I was very occupied with some assignments from the university after the two week travel that I had in August for Akademy and ERBASE (which is a congress that I had presented a paper). I am in the end of this semester in the university, so I am anxious for my vacations to code more in the projects that I contribute to.

    Well, following this brief comment about Akademy, I will start talking about what I have done in KDE in the weeks of August/September. I am still working in that RAID patch on KDE Partition Manager, where I still got some problems with device mapping and udev. The RAID arrays are not been mapped as I expected. Also there are some bugs related to partition creation inside of RAID and another one related to udev, that is keeping the device busy, which will raise some errors when you try to do any disk operation.

  • My Open Source Contributions Week in Review, Debian sponsor needed!

    It has been a busy week!

    My significant accomplishment this week is the packaging of squashfuse for Debian.

    This is required for libappimage, which is next on my to-do list.

    I have uploaded it to mentors here: https://mentors.debian.net/package/squashfuse

    I do have a mentor/sponsor, but under the KDE umbrella ( Thank you lisandro! ),

    he is very busy and I would like to give him a break on this one.

    If anyone has some spare time to give this a look, thank you!

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities September 2018
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in September 2018
  • Debian Developers Weighed The Idea Of Not Allowing Q&A Sessions At Their Conference

    Debian developers have been discussing what to many seems like a rather unorthodox idea of not allowing questions/answers following presentations at their annual DebConf conference. This idea of banning questions and answers follows a policy by a Python conference that forbids questions/answers following presentations and is meant to help ease newcomers.

    Debian developers have largely rejected this idea of not allowing Q&A periods following presentations at DebConf considering this annual gathering of developers/contributors is about collaboration and fostering new ideas for this leading Linux distribution. The idea though was brought up by Debian Project Leader Chris Lamb who initiated the discussion over this idea after seeing the PyCascades Python conference has explicitly banned question and answer sessions following presentations at their conference.

  • Calibre and rar support – again

    Rar support is necessary in the case that the eBook uses rar as compression, which happens quite often in comic books (cbr extension). Calibre 3 has split out rar support into a dynamically loaded module, so what needs to be done is packaging it. I have prepared a package for the Python library unrardll which allows Calibre to read rar-compressed ebooks, but it depends on the unrar shared library, which unfortunately is not built in Debian. I have sent a patch to fix this to the maintainer, see bug 720051, but without reaction from the maintainer.

    This has passed now the time-frame of a year, so I have decided to “salvage” unrar-nonfree. Package salvaging has been recently introduced into the Debian ecosystem to step in between leaving the package in dire state and the full MIA process...

More Debian work, September 2018

  • Debian LTS work, September 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 18 hours from July and August. I worked 29 hours and therefore carry over 4 hours to October.

  • Free Software: Summary September 2018

    This is my monthly summary of what I have been doing related to Free Software in September 2018.

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As it can be seen in the first graph, perhaps with some difficulty, is that the percent of arch-dependent packages built for riscv64 (grey line) has been around or higher than 80% since mid 2018, just a few months after the port was added to the infrastructure. Given than the arch-dependent packages are about half of the Debian['s main, unstable] archive and that (in simple terms) arch-independent packages can be used by all ports (provided that the software that they rely on is present, e.g. a programming language interpreter), this means that around 90% of packages of the whole archive has been available for this architecture from early on. Read more

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    Mac OS is everybody’s favorite, and there are several reasons behind it. One of the most useful utilities you can find on Mac OS is Spotlight, which makes searching for things a piece of cake, all directly from the desktop. While most developers have already designed similar utilities for Windows, the open-source Linux based operating systems are no exception, as well. Most Linux operating systems like Ubuntu have its own search functionality, but it can sometimes be troublesome to reach there and isn’t as powerful as Spotlight. So with Synapse for Linux, you can do just that, and boost the power of the search functionality on your system. With Synapse for Ubuntu, you can even search for things on the web, which is cool, as well. Some Linux distros like Lubuntu, don’t offer decent search functionality, and Synapse can be a great solution in such cases. With Synapse, searching is easy with just the navigation buttons on your keyboard, and you are ready to go. Synapse can be downloaded and installed from the Linux official repository. Synapse can also be configured to run on startup so that too don’t need to search for, and open Synapse, each time you need to use it.
  • Qmmp 1.3.3 Released with Floating PulseAudio, ALSA, OSS4 Support
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  • Week 3 Report
    I continue working on Rewriting the logger messages with the new DSL grammar: