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Novell "Forking" OpenOffice.org

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SUSE

Well, if there are any Novell supporters left, here's something else to put in your pipe and smoke it. Novell is forking OpenOffice.org.

There will be a Novell edition of OpenOffice.org and it will support Microsoft OpenXML. (The default will be ODF, they claim, but note that the subheading mentions OpenXML instead.) I am guessing this will be the only OpenOffice.org covered by the "patent agreement" with Microsoft. You think?

Note the role Novell played in Massachusetts also in the ODF story in News Picks. I think it's clear now what Microsoft gets out of this Novell deal -- they get to persuade enterprise users to stay with Microsoft Office, because now they don't "need" to switch to Linux. And they don't need to leave Microsoft products to use ODF. So, while Novell may call this "Novell OpenOffice.org" I feel free to call it "Sellout Linux OpenOffice.org". Money can do strange things to people. And Microsoft knows it.

Full Story.

Other coverage Here and Here.

There is

a point of this... One weak piece of a strong chain makes the whole thingy useless. Novell become the "weak" part, forking OpenOffice is like cuting down roots of a tree called OpenSource o yes hard words but what looked like Novell MS Deal concerning Novell and MS now begins to mix other parts of the "free side"...
Only now slowly (not that slowly) patiently we will see the "beautifull" and inavitable strategy of MS to search and destroy...
As I stated before MS doesn't make deals it asimilates one or another way... One shiny example is OS/2 what is was, how it was superb to Windows and where it ended.....
We will see.....
As is written "Money can do strange things to people. And Microsoft knows it."

Groklaw scrapping the bottom of the barrel

Miguel de Icaza: OpenOffice Forks?
http://tirania.org/blog/index.html

"Facts barely matter when they get in the way of a good smear. The comments over at Groklaw are interesting, in that they explore new levels of ignorance."

Pascal Bleser: Groklaw FUD machine
http://dev-loki.blogspot.com/

This site worse than SCO or Microsoft

Why report falsehoods and spread lies? I guess there is a new "foss" community of liars intent on destroying free software from within. Very sad. Very poor research. Very, very poor reporting. Oh well. This isn't Darl's new site is it?

re: This site worse than SCO or Microsoft

I hope you mean Groklaw! :eek:

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Me too!

srlinuxx wrote:
I hope you mean Groklaw! :eek:

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

I had the same thought myself, at first.
__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

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