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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chromebooks gain faff-free access to Windows file shares via Samba

    Google’s Chrome OS tanks crept a little further onto Microsoft’s manicured enterprise lawns with hints that Windows file-share support will arrive out-of-the-box in an upcoming version of Chrome OS.

    Those brave enough to be on the Canary version of Chrome 70 already have the functionality, assuming the preview software stays upright long enough to connect. The code uses the Samba project's libsmbclient to access the file shares.

    Veteran Windows blogger Paul Thurrott spotted a posting on Google+ by "Chromium Evangelist" François Beaufort indicating that the functionality was inbound. In the post, Beaufort linked to a Chromium code commit with the text: "Set NativeSmb flag to enabled by default – Network File Shares for ChromeOS will be available by default starting in M70."

  • [Gentoo] We mostly protect against script kiddie attacks

    The recent efforts on improving the security of different areas of Gentoo have brought some arguments. Some time ago one of the developers has considered whether he would withstand physical violence if an attacker would use it in order to compromise Gentoo. A few days later another developer has suggested that an attacker could pay Gentoo developers to compromise the distribution. Is this a real threat to Gentoo? Are we all doomed?

    Before I answer this question, let me make an important presumption. Gentoo is a community-driven open source project. As such, it has certain inherent weaknesses and there is no way around them without changing what Gentoo fundamentally is. Those weaknesses are common to all projects of the same nature.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, August 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 8 hours from July. I worked only 5 hours and therefore carried over 18 hours to September.

  • TeX Live contrib updates

    It is now more than a year that I took over tlcontrib from Taco and provide it at the TeX Live contrib repository. It does now serve old TeX Live 2017 as well as the current TeX Live 2018, and since last year the number of packages has increased from 52 to 70.

  • Core i5-7500-based signage player supports NVIDIA MXM graphics cards

    Ibase launched its “SI-614” signage player that runs Linux or Windows 10 on a Core i5-7500 processor with up to 16GB DDR4, a choice of NVIDIA MXM NV1050 graphics cards and a 128 GB 2.5-inch SSD storage device.

    Ibase Technology has announced the SI-614, its latest digital signage player based on 7th Gen Intel Core desktop processors and supporting NVIDIA MXM GeForce GTX 10 Series graphics. These cards provide 3X the performance of previous-generation graphics cards, according to the company. This is the sixth signage player Ibase has introduced this year, the most recent being its AMD Ryzen V1000 based system, the SI-324, released in late August.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Linux 5.2 Dissection, New Patches, New ZDNet (CBS) FUD and Kali NetHunter App Store

  • Kees Cook: security things in Linux v5.2

    Gustavo A. R. Silva is nearly done with marking (and fixing) all the implicit fall-through cases in the kernel. Based on the pull request from Gustavo, it looks very much like v5.3 will see -Wimplicit-fallthrough added to the global build flags and then this class of bug should stay extinct in the kernel. That’s it for now; let me know if you think I should add anything here. We’re almost to -rc1 for v5.3!

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libreoffice), Red Hat (thunderbird), SUSE (ardana and crowbar, firefox, libgcrypt, and xrdp), and Ubuntu (nss, squid3, and wavpack).

  • Malicious Python libraries targeting Linux servers removed from PyPI [Ed: Python does not run only on Linux, but Microsoft-funded sites like ZDNet (CBS) look for ways to blame everything on "Linux", even malicious software that gets caught in the supply chain]
  • Malicious Python Libraries Discovered on PyPI, Offensive Security Launches the Kali NetHunter App Store, IBM Livestreaming a Panel with Original Apollo 11 Technicians Today, Azul Systems Announces OpenJSSE and Krita 4.2.3 Released

    Offensive Security, the creators of open-source Kali Linux, has launched the Kali NetHunter App Store, "a new one stop shop for security relevant Android applications. Designed as an alternative to the Google Play store for Android devices, the NetHunter store is an installable catalogue of Android apps for pentesting and forensics". The press release also notes that the NetHunter store is a slightly modified version of F-Droid: "While F-Droid installs its clients with telemetry disabled and asks for consent before submitting crash reports, the NetHunter store goes a step further by removing the entire code to ensure that privacy cannot be accidentally compromised". See the Kali.org blog post for more details.

Ubuntu/Fedora GNOME Feud and GNOME's Sriram Ramkrishna

  • Fedora, GNOME Software, and snap

    A question about the future of package distribution is at the heart of a disagreement about the snap plugin for the GNOME Software application in Fedora. In a Fedora devel mailing list thread, Richard Hughes raised multiple issues about the plugin and the direction that he sees Canonical taking with snaps for Ubuntu. He plans to remove support for the plugin for GNOME Software in Fedora 31. There are currently two major players for cross-distribution application bundles these days: snaps, which were developed by Canonical for Ubuntu and the Snap Store, and Flatpak, which was developed by Alexander Larsson of Red Hat as part of freedesktop.org. Both systems are available for multiple Linux distributions. They are meant to give an "app-like" experience, where users simply install an application, which comes with any dependencies it has that are not provided by the snap or Flatpak runtime. The GNOME Software application has a snap plugin that, when enabled, supports the distribution, installation, and management of snaps. The Fedora project currently provides the snap plugin as a package in Fedora 30, though it is not installed by default. Hughes is the Fedora maintainer for the plugin; he announced his intention to disable the plugin since, he says, he was told that Canonical was not going to be installing GNOME Software in the next Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) release.

  • Molly de Blanc: Meet Sriram Ramkrishna

    Sriram Ramkrishna, frequently known as Sri, is perhaps GNOME’s oldest contributor. He’s been around the community for almost as long as it’s been around! [...] But more than that, GNOME was a project that if you think about it was audacious in its purpose. Building a desktop in 1997 around an operating system that was primitive in terms of user experience, tooling, and experience. I wanted to be part of that.

Mozilla: Android, VR and Rust

  • Recent fixes to reduce backlog on Android phones

    Last week it seemed that all our limited resource machines were perpetually backlogged. I wrote yesterday to provide insight into what we run and some of our limitations. This post will be discussing the Android phones backlog last week specifically. The Android phones are hosted at Bitbar and we split them into pools (battery testing, unit testing, perf testing) with perf testing being the majority of the devices.

  • Q&A: Igniting imaginations and putting VR in the hands of students with Kai Frazier

    When you were in school, you may have taken a trip to a museum or a local park, but you probably never got to see an active volcano or watch great whites hunt. As Virtual Reality grows, this could be the way your kids will learn — using headsets the way we use computers. When you were in school, you may have gone on a trip to the museum, but you probably never stood next to an erupting volcano, watching molten lava pouring down its sides. As Virtual Reality (VR) grows, learning by going into the educational experience could be the way children will learn — using VR headsets the way we use computers. This kind of technology holds huge potential in shaping young minds, but like with most technology, not all public schools get the same access. For those who come from underserved communities, the high costs to technology could widen an already existing gap in learning, and future incomes.

  • This Week in Rust 295 [Ed: Just delete GitHub , Mozila, And why you're at it, stop using proprietary software and imposing it on Rust contributors.]

    This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub.

  • How to speed up the Rust compiler in 2019

    libsyntax has three tables in a global data structure, called Globals, storing information about spans (code locations), symbols, and hygiene data (which relates to macro expansion). Accessing these tables is moderately expensive, so I found various ways to improve things.

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Generate a List of Random Integers in Python

    This tutorial explains several ways to generate random numbers list in Python. Here, we’ll mainly use three Python random number generation functions. These are random.randint(), random.randrange(), and random.sample(). You can find full details of these methods here: Generate random numbers in Python. All these functions are part of the Random module. It employs a fast pseudorandom number generator which uses the Mersenne Twister algorithm. However today, we’ll focus on producing a list of non-repeating integers only. Go through the below bullets to continue.

  • Coverage.py 5.0a6: context reporting

    I’ve released another alpha of coverage.py 5.0: coverage.py 5.0a6. There are some design decisions ahead that I could use feedback on. [...] I know this is a lot, and the 5.0 alpha series has been going on for a while. The features are shaping up to be powerful and useful. All of your feedback has been very helpful, keep it coming.

  • Gradient Boosting Classifiers in Python with Scikit-Learn

    Gradient boosting classifiers are a group of machine learning algorithms that combine many weak learning models together to create a strong predictive model. Decision trees are usually used when doing gradient boosting. Gradient boosting models are becoming popular because of their effectiveness at classifying complex datasets, and have recently been used to win many Kaggle data science competitions. The Python machine learning library, Scikit-Learn, supports different implementations of gradient boosting classifiers, including XGBoost.

  • What are *args and **kwargs and How to use them
  • Create a Flask Application With Google Login

    You’ve probably seen the option for Google Login on various websites. Some sites also have more options like Facebook Login or GitHub Login. All these options allow users to utilize existing accounts to use a new service. In this article, you’ll work through the creation of a Flask web application. Your application will allow a user to log in using their Google identity instead of creating a new account. There are tons of benefits with this method of user management. It’s going to be safer and simpler than managing the traditional username and password combinations. This article will be more straightforward if you already understand the basics of Python. It would also help to know a bit about web frameworks and HTTP requests, but that’s not strictly necessary.