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Software: Curlew, Kiwi TCMS, ScreenCloud, KStars, Fractal and WinMagic

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  • Curlew: Still Great Multimedia Converter That Uses FFmpeg for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Right now there are handful of multimedia converters available for Linux. It is an free and open-source application that converts to plenty of formats using FFMpeg and avconv. It is written using Python programming language and GTK3 for GUI. Currently has ability to convert more than 100 different formats.
    Curlew multimedia converter is around from quite sometime and known to have some extra features such as: ability to show file information(duration, progress, approx size, duration etc.), preview file before conversion, convert part of specified file, attach subtitles to videos, show errors in details if occurs, allow to skip files or remove during conversion process, and fairly simple user interface. It is available for all currently supported Ubuntu 18.04/16.04/14.04/Linux Mint 19/18/17 and other Ubuntu based distributions.

  • Happy birthday Kiwi TCMS
  • ScreenCloud: The Screenshot++ App

    ScreenCloud is an amazing little app, that you don’t even know you need. The default screenshot procedure on desktop Linux is great (Prt Scr Button) and we even have some powerful screenshot utilities like Shutter. But ScreenCloud brings one more really simple yet really convenient feature that I just fell in love with. But before we get into it, let’s catch a little backstory.

    I take a lot of screenshots. A lot more than average. Receipts, registration details, development work, screenshots of applications for articles, and lot more. The next thing I do is open a browser, browse to my favorite cloud storage and dump the important ones there so that I can access them on my phone and also across multiple operating systems on my PC. This also allows me to easily share screenshots of the apps that I’m working on with my team.

    I had no complaints with this standard procedure of taking screenshots, opening a browser and logging into my cloud and then uploading the screenshots manually, until I came across ScreenCloud.

  • KStars on Microsoft Store

    I'm glad to announce that KStars is now available on Microsoft Store in over 60 languages! It is the first official KDE App to be published by KDE e.V on the MS Store.

  • Fractal contribution report: improvements for the context menu

    These past weeks, I’ve been mainly working on my side project (rlife) but I’ve also done some small improvements for the context menu in Fractal.

    [...]

    I also have an open MR for hiding the option to delete messages in the context menu when the user doesn’t have the right to do so (i.e. for the user’s own messages or when it has the right to do so in the room (e.g. for moderators or owners)). It’s pending for now because there are work done to reliably calculate the power level of a user given a certain room.

  • WinMagic delivers enterprise-class managed full drive encryption solution for Linux [Ed: WinMagic is proprietary. Never trust anything proprietary for encryption (typically has back doors).]
  • WinMagic Enables Enterprise-Class Full Drive Encryption for Linux

    WinMagic, an award-winning encryption and key management solution provider, announces today that it has recently delivered the first known enterprise-class managed full drive encryption solution for Linux. The new capability empowers the company to assist enterprises struggling with managing encryption of their Linux-based devices.

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