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Red Hat News: IBM, Ansible Tower, Federal Source Code Policy and More

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Red Hat
  • Hortonworks, IBM & Red Hat Partner on Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative

    Hortonworks (Nasdaq: HDP), IBM (NYSE: IBM) and Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) have entered into a partnership in an effort to help customers utilize hybrid cloud environments to field and run big data workloads, ExecutiveBiz reported Tuesday.

    Red Hat said Monday the collaborative Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative aims to develop a common enterprise deployment model for big data workloads and utilize the Red Hat OpenShift enterprise container and Kubernetes platform to support Hortonworks Data Platform, Hortonworks DataFlow, Hortonworks DataPlane and IBM Cloud Private for Data.

  • Red Hat Announces Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3

    Red Hat, Inc. recently introduced Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3 - the newest iteration of its enterprise framework for automating and orchestrating IT operations. Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.3 gets improved scaling and the ability to run Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, enterprise-grade Kubernetes container application platform, and an updated user interface.

  • IBM Relies on Kubernetes to Advance Analytics Strategy

    IBM this week extended the reach of the IBM Cloud Private (ICP) for Data platform to include the Red Hat OpenShift platform based on Kubernetes. ICP also aligns with Red Hat and Hortonworks on the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative for building hybrid big data applications on the Red Hat OpenShift platform.

    In addition, IBM today announced it has extended ICP for Data to enable analytics queries to access data anywhere, by leveraging container-based technologies.

  • Innovation, we deliver! The Red Hat Mobile Portfolio Center is on the move

    Pay attention when you’re driving - you might just see Red Hat’s Shadowman in the next lane. You see, innovation is on the move at Red Hat! Or as Program Manager, Chris Hawver would say – the Mobile Portfolio Center (MPC) – is bringing Red Hat’s innovative solutions to the customer at venues near their offices.

    The annual Red Hat Summit, or the Red Hat Executive Briefing Centers around the globe, are great ways to catch up with the latest from Red Hat. But, due to travel and scheduling constraints, many of our customers miss those opportunities. So we’re expanding our reach with the MPC. We have many more stops planned as part of this initiative, there is a good chance the MPC is coming to a venue near you.

  • Red Hat’s OPEN FIRST road tour rolls on -- and into D.C.

    Two years ago, the U.S. government took an important step towards its technological future. The issuance of the Federal Source Code Policy in 2016 called for “efficiency, transparency, and innovation through reusable and open source software.” Since then, a number of important programs and initiatives have been created, including Code.gov, code.mil and others.

    Yet we believe there is still a significant amount of untapped potential for open source in government. That’s why we have created the Red Hat OPEN FIRST Road Tour, a nationwide seminar series aimed at bringing the open source discussion to government leaders across the U.S.

  • Futures Directions for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Flagship Harbor Advisors LLC Grows Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Financial Review: Red Hat (RHT) vs. Weibo (WB)
  • Fedora: LibreOffice remote connection.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Google is winning in education, but Apple and Microsoft are battling for market share
    Apple used to have the most devices in U.S. schools, but Google soared to the top after the release of the Chromebook in 2011. In 2018, Chromebooks made up 60 percent of all laptops and tablets purchased for U.S. K-12 classrooms, up from just 5 percent in 2012. Microsoft is second at 22 percent, followed by Apple, with 18 percent of shipments to U.S. schools in 2018, according to data from Futuresource Consulting.
  • Design and Web team summary – 15 March 2019
    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. [...] We maintain the Vanilla css framework that most of the websites at Ubuntu and Canonical use. Here are a few patterns and websites that were updated.
  • The New York Times has released an open-source tool to let you manage all your internal knowledge more easily

    Library is a wiki at heart, but it uses the familiar Google Docs as its backend and editing interface, easing maintenance for a wide population of users (“we wanted to meet people where they already were, rather than trying to teach them something entirely new”).

  • We Built a Collaborative Documentation Site. Deploy Your Own With the Push of a Button.

    Our solution to this problem has worked well for us. We hope others will find value in the technology we built, so we’re releasing Library to the open source community.

  • foss-north 2019: Community Day
    I don’t dare to count the days until foss-north 2019, but it is very soon. One of the changes to this year is that we expand the conference with an additional community day. The idea with the community day here is that we arrange for conference rooms all across town and invite open source projects to use them for workshops, install fests, hackathons, dev sprints or whatever else they see fit. It is basically a day of mini-conferences spread out across town. The community day is on April 7, the day before the conference days, and is free of charge.
  • FSFE Newsletter March 2019
    This month's newsletter highlights the new project the FSFE recently joined and the funding opportunities it offers, that you may want to take advantage of. You can get the latest updates on the Copyright Directive reform and the hottest news regarding Article 13, as well as a short summary of what else has happened during the past month. In the Editor's choice section this month you can find interesting news on developments with the Radio Equipment Directive, and find out who else have expressed their support for our "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign and what they have to say about it.

Server Leftovers

  • Google Open Sources Sandboxed API
    Google on Monday announced that it has made available its Sandboxed API as open source in an effort to make it easier for software developers to create secure products. It’s not uncommon for applications to be affected by memory corruption or other types of vulnerabilities that can be exploited for remote code execution and other purposes. Using a sandbox ensures that the code responsible for processing user input can only access the resources it needs to, which mitigates the impact of a flaw by containing the exploit to a restricted environment and preventing it from interacting with other software components. While sandboxing can be highly useful, Google says it’s often not easy to implement. That is why the internet giant has decided to open source its Sandboxed API, which should make it easier to sandbox C and C++ libraries. The company has also open sourced its core sandboxing project, Sandbox2, which can be used on its own to secure Linux processes.
  • BMC Touches Clouds with Job Scheduler
    Clouds are growing quickly as IT executives look to find more flexibility and cut costs by adopting cloud and software as a service (SaaS) applications. But most enterprises aren’t getting rid of all their on-premise systems, which means somebody needs to connect those cloud and on-premise systems. One of those “somebodies” is BMC Software.
  • Midnight Commander Comes To IBM i
    IBM i professionals who work extensively with files in the IFS will be happy to hear a new software utility has been ported to the IBM i PASE environment that could save them a bunch of time. The open source software, called Midnight Commander, gives developers and administrators a handy command line experience that can help speed up tasks, especially when giving commands to large number of files stored on remote machines. Midnight Commander was originally developed in 1994 as a file utility for UNIX, which was beginning to emerge from software labs to challenge minicomputer platforms of the day, such as the AS/400, as well as early Windows operating systems. Miguel de Icaza, who’s known for founding the Mono project (among others), is credited with creating Midnight Commander, but over the years development of the product has become a group effort. The utility, which is distributed via a GNU license from www.midnightcommander.org, was largely modeled off Norton Commander, an MS-DOS utility developed in the 1980s by Norton. But Midnight Commander has evolved into its own thing over the years, and the resemblance to that old Norton product today largely is only in the name.

Top 10 New Linux SBCs to Watch in 2019

A recent Global Market Insights report projects the single board computer market will grow from $600 million in 2018 to $1 billion by 2025. Yet, you don’t need to read a market research report to realize the SBC market is booming. Driven by the trends toward IoT and AI-enabled edge computing, new boards keep rolling off the assembly lines, many of them tailored for highly specific applications. Much of the action has been in Linux-compatible boards, including the insanely popular Raspberry Pi. The number of different vendors and models has exploded thanks in part to the rise of community-backed, open-spec SBCs. Here we examine 10 of the most intriguing, Linux-driven SBCs among the many products announced in the last four weeks that bookended the recent Embedded World show in Nuremberg. (There was also some interesting Linux software news at the show.) Two of the SBCs—the Intel Whiskey Lake based UP Xtreme and Nvidia Jetson Nano driven Jetson Nano Dev Kit—were announced only this week. Read more

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