Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Forgetting to renew domain name can be disastrous

Filed under
Web

If the Web is your small or home business' front door, losing control of your Internet domain name can be catastrophic.

A domain name is the name of a Web site or the part of an e-mail address that comes after the (AT) sign. It's the part of the Web address (or URL) that comes after the http://www. part.

"It's amazing how many businesses don't equate the domain name with the Web site name or their business name," says Aaron Larkins, president of Profitability.net in Cincinnati, which helps companies set up Web sites along with domains and domain names. "It's as much of a brand as anything else. And some people just let it slip away, not knowing how important it is."

No statistics are available, but Larkins and other experts in the field say they see a fairly constant stream of businesses letting their domain name registries lapse. That omission, in turn, can lead to breakdowns of their Web sites or their e-mail systems.

Just look at some of the names that have had this happen in the past couple of years:

- The Washington Post's e-mail system went down for at least several hours last February when that company did not renew its (AT)washpost.com domain name, although the Web site continued operating normally.

- Online auction site eBay briefly lost control of its German site www.eBay.de last September when hackers apparently got control of its domain name.

- In January, New York-based Internet service provider Panix, host to scores of business Web sites and e-mail systems, lost control of its own domain, with all the Web traffic being directed to a company in Australia and e-mail going to another firm in England. It took more than 24 hours to straighten out the situation.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more