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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • People Think Their Passwords Are Too Awesome For Two Factor Authentication. They’re Wrong.
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Let's Encrypt Now Trusted by All Major Root Programs

    Now, the CA’s root is directly trusted by almost all newer versions of operating systems, browsers, and devices. Many older versions, however, still do not directly trust Let’s Encrypt.

    While some of these are expected to be updated to trust the CA, others won’t, and it might take at least five more years until most of them cycle out of the Web ecosystem. Until that happens, Let’s Encrypt will continue to use a cross signature.

  • WPA2 flaw lets attackers easily crack WiFi passwords

    The security flaw was found, accidentally, by security researcher Jens Steube while conducting tests on the forthcoming WPA3 security protocol; in particular, on differences between WPA2's Pre-Shared Key exchange process and WPA3's Simultaneous Authentication of Equals, which will replace it. WPA3 will be much harder to attack because of this innovation, he added.

  • ​Linux kernel network TCP bug fixed

    Another day, another bit of security hysteria. This time around the usually reliable Carnegie Mellon University's CERT/CC, claimed the Linux kernel's TCP network stack could be "forced to make very expensive calls to tcp_collapse_ofo_queue() and tcp_prune_ofo_queue() for every incoming packet which can lead to a denial of service (DoS)."

  • State of Security for Open Source Web Applications 2018

    ach year, we publish a set of statistics summarizing the vulnerabilities we find in open source web applications. Our tests form part of Netsparker's quality assurance practices, during which we scan thousands of web applications and websites. This helps us to add to our security checks and continuously improve the scanner's accuracy.

    This blog post includes statistics based on security research conducted throughout 2017. But first, we take a look at why we care about open source applications, and the damage that can be caused for enterprises when they go wrong.

  • New Actor DarkHydrus Targets Middle East with Open-Source Phishing [Ed: Headline says "Open-Source Phishing," but this is actually about Microsoft Windows and Office (proprietary and full of serious bugs)]

    Government entities and educational institutions in the Middle East are under attack in an ongoing credential-harvesting campaign.

    Government entities and educational institutions in the Middle East are under attack in an ongoing credential-harvesting campaign, mounted by a newly-named threat group known as DarkHydrus. In a twist on the norm, the group is leveraging the open-source Phishery tool to carry out its dark work.

    The attacks follow a well-worn pattern, according to Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 group: Spear-phishing emails with attached malicious Microsoft Office documents are leveraging the “attachedTemplate” technique to load a template from a remote server.

More in Tux Machines

Flock 2018 Reports

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Vega 20 PowerPlay

  • Power Management Updates Land In The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Intel's Rafael Wysocki has submitted the ACPI and power management updates today for the Linux 4.19 kernel which were subsequently merged by Linus Torvalds.
  • Linux 4.19 Git Contains a lot of Performance Impacting Spectre Mitigation Updates
    Another round of commits regarding anti-Spectre security have landed up in the Linux 4.19 kernel git tree, which may have possible performance impacts for the kernel. While Spectre is still only a somewhat theoretical threat, as its entirely too slow to be used in a serious attack, many folks are taking its future potential quite seriously and arming up against it.
  • Linux 4.19 Kernel to Receive a Ton of Audio Hardware Updates for Improved Linux Sound Capabilities
    Linux audiophiles may have something to rejoice about, as a recent pull request from SUSE’s Takashi Iwai focuses on a plethora of sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel, including a lot of latest hardware support and overall improvements for Linux’s audio capabilities.
  • Updated Vega 20 Open-Source Driver Patches Posted, Including PSP & PowerPlay Support
    Back in May AMD posted initial open-source "Vega 20" patches and support for that yet-to-launch graphics processor was subsequently merged for the Linux 4.18 kernel. More of the Vega 20 AMDGPU kernel driver enablement has now been posted. This latest 69,910 lines of code -- before fretting, most of that is auto-generated header files for the GPU -- notably adds PSP (Platform Security Processor) and SMU (System Management Unit) for Vega 20. With the SMU enablement code, it's also now wired in to enable Vega 20 PowerPlay support as well as related power/clocking-functionality like OverDrive overclocking is also available.

today's howtos

Security: Disclose.io, Adobe, Apple and Instagram

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