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GNOME Development Updates

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GNOME
  • libgepub + rust

    In 2010 I was working with evince, the gnome PDF document viewer, trying to add some accessibility to PDF files. That was really hard, not because GTK+ or ATK technology but because the PDF format itself. The PDF format is really cool for printing because you know that the piece of paper will look the same as the PDF doc, and because it's vector it scales and don't loose quality and files are smaller than image files, but almost all PDF files have not any metadata for sections, headings, tablets or so, this depends on the creation tool, but it's really hard to deal with PDF content text, because you don't know event if the text that you're reading is really in the same order that you read from the PDF.

    After my fight against the PDF format hell and poppler, I discovered the epub format that's a really simple format for electronic books. An epub is a zip with some XML files describing the book index and every chapter is a xhtml and xhtml is a good format compared to PDF because you can parse easily with any XML lib and the content is tagged and well structured so you know what's a heading, what's a paragraph, etc.

    So I started to write a simple C library to read epub files, thinking about add epub support to evince. That's how libgepub was born. I tried to integrate libgepub in evince, I've something working, rendering with webkit, but nothing really useful, because evince needs pages and it's not easy to split an xhtml file in pages with the same height, because xhtml is continuous text and it adapts to the page width, so I give up and leave this branch.

  • My final report for GSoC 2018

    The Google Summer of Code 2018 is coming to an end for me, so it means that it’s time for the final report!

    [...]

    I’ve created a media (although for now it only works with pictures) viewer for Fractal. Its purpose is to easily have a better view of the images within a room, to be able to zoom in and out of them, to navigate between the different images of the room in the chronological order, to enter in a full screen mode and to save a copy of the media in the filesystem. I made a first implementation and then had to do a lot of other improvements. I’ve spent about a month working on it.

    There is still the need to improve the zoom of the media viewer as the pictures are a little bit blurred and it’s not possible to zoom beyond 100%. There are optimizations to do as the application becomes very slow when trying to zoom beyond 100% on large pictures.

  • GUADEC 2018

    A few weeks ago I attended GUADEC in Almeria, Spain. The travel was a bit of an adventure, because Julian and I went there and back from Italy by train. It was great though, because we had lots of time to hack on Fractal on the train.

    [...]

    On Monday I attended the all-day Librem 5 BoF, together with my colleagues from Purism, and some community members, such as Jordan and Julian from Fractal.

    We talked about apps, particularly the messaging situation and Fractal. We discussed what will be needed in order to split the app, make the UI adaptive, and get end-to-end encryption. Daniel’s work on the database and Julian’s message history refactor are currently laying the groundwork for these.

    On the shell side we talked through the design of various parts of the shell, such as keyboard, notifications, multitasking, and gestures. Though many of those things won’t be implemented in the near future, we have a plan for where we’re going with these, and getting designers and developers in one room was very productive for working out some of the details.

    We also discussed a number of exciting new widgets to make it easier to get GNOME apps to work at smaller sizes, such as a new adaptive preferences window, and a way to allow modal windows to take up the entire screen at small sizes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 19.10 Daily Builds Are Now Available to Download

While the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) just hit the streets at the end of last week, Canonical's Ubuntu team are already working on the next release, Ubuntu 19.10, which doesn't have a codename at the moment of writing, but we do know that it will be an "Eoan" animal that start with the letter E. Until Canonical decided to give Ubuntu 19.10 a proper codename, early adopters and testers can now download the daily build ISO images, which are available for Ubuntu Desktop and Ubuntu Server, as well as the official flavors, including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, and Ubuntu Kylin. Read more

Apache: AirFlow, PLC4X and Market Share

  • Whirl Adds Local AirFlow Development Technique
    Apache Airflow is a workflow automation and scheduling system that you can use to set up and manage data pipelines. It uses workflows made of directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) of tasks. Each task produces some output that is then used as the input to another task. The idea of Whirl is to make it easy to run and develop Airflow workflows on your local machine. This gives you rapid feedback about whether the changes you made to your DAG work. The developers suggest you think of it as your integration test environment for developing Airflow DAGs.
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® PLC4X™ as a Top-Level Project
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today Apache® PLC4X™ as a Top-Level Project (TLP). Apache PLC4X also has the designation as being the 200th project to graduate from the Apache Incubator. Apache PLC4X is a universal protocol adapter for creating Industrial IoT applications through a set of libraries that allow unified access to a wide range of industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs) using a variety of protocols with a shared API. The project was originally developed at codecentric AG, and entered the Apache Incubator in December 2017.
  • April 2019 Web Server Survey
    Despite the overall loss of sites this month, nginx gained 22.3 million websites and 2.03 million additional active sites. nginx also gained the largest number of web-facing computers, increasing its total by 63,000 to 2.57 million (+2.52%). nginx's market share of web-facing computers is now nearly 30%, and this is continuing to grow steadily closer to Apache's leading share of 37.3%. Microsoft and Apache lost shares in every headline metric this month, with both vendors contributing significantly to this month's overall loss of sites. Microsoft lost 18.9 million sites, while Apache lost 17.2 million, causing their shares to decrease by 1.01 and 0.87 percentage points. These changes have pushed nginx into the lead, giving it a 27.5% share of all sites in Netcraft's April 2019 Web Server Survey. Significantly, this is the first time since 1996 that a vendor other than Microsoft or Apache has served the largest number of websites.

Games: Farm Life, ProtoCorgi, Teeworlds, Sigma Theory: Global Cold War, Steam on Ubuntu 19.04, Optimizations For Mesa 19.1

  • Farm Life, the Match 3 game about restoring a farm has been released for Linux and it's lovely
    Great to see another Match 3 game on Linux with Farm Life, ported over by Bearded Giant Games as part of their Linux 1st Initiative. I had the pleasure of testing this one before releasing and it's sucked away hours from me! Not a genre I play too often, partly because there's not many good Match 3 games available on Linux, so for me this does fill a little hole. Although I will fully admit that I was horribly addicted to Candy Crush on Android a few years ago.
  • The shoot 'em up 'ProtoCorgi' now has an updated demo, which is also on Steam for Linux too
    In ProtoCorgi you're a pup that means business, serious business. You play as Bullet, a cybernetic pup on a quest to save your owner. Since I tested the original demo, it's had a pretty large update reworking some systems which you can find a full changelog of here. This Godot Engine powered shoot 'em up is very promising, so I'm looking forward to seeing the full game. What the demo offers is obviously quite short, as it's only meant as a taster of what's to come
  • Teeworlds, the classic free multiplayer platform battler is still being updated and it's looking good
    Teeworlds, a game that's been around for a great many years now continues to be improved and updated with another update pushed out recently. For those who've never played it, Teeworlds is a side-scrolling platform action game played online across various game modes like deathmatch, team deathmatch and capture the flag. It's free, it's also open source (GitHub) and if you manage to get a bunch of people together to play with, it can be seriously fun.
  • The near-future game of espionage 'Sigma Theory: Global Cold War' is out in Early Access
    Developed by Mi-Clos Studio (Out There) and Goblinz Studio (Robothorium, Dungeon Rushers), Sigma Theory: Global Cold War, a game about using special agents to attempt control of the world has entered Early Access with Linux support recently. In the near-future scientists made a discovery called the Sigma Theory, which could throw the world into complete chaos. Apparently it's capable of helping to create new weapons of insane power, as well as tools that could disrupt everything from the economy to the human mind. Sounds pretty wild, so naturally everyone wants a piece of the pie.
  • How to install Steam on Ubuntu 19.04
    In this video, we look at how to install Steam on Ubuntu 19.04.
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Picks Up More Game Performance Optimizations For Mesa 19.1
    There is just one week to go until the Mesa 19.1 feature freeze and branching for this next quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers. Notable this round is the introduction of the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver for supporting Broadwell graphics and newer atop this next-gen OpenGL driver ahead of next year's Xe Graphics dGPU launch. With days to go until the Mesa 19.1 feature freeze, more performance optimizations have landed. Kenneth Graunke of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center who has led the Iris Gallium3D driver development for more than the past year pushed a number of notable improvements into Mesa Git today. iris: Track valid data range and infer unsynchronized mappings - On Skylake graphics this improves the FPS average for games like DiRT Rally, Bioshock Infinite, and Shadow of Mordor by 2~7% and the max FPS by as much as 9~20%.