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OSS Leftovers

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  • Guest View: In praise of open source

    When you think of little social movements that bring about big societal shifts, the first thing that comes to mind probably isn’t open source. But maybe it should be.

    The technological revolution that is steadily digitizing every nook and cranny of human activity obviously relies on code, and open-source code underpins much of the recent surge in innovation. Streaming movies? Digital Assistants? Autonomous cars? All made possible to some degree by the open-source movement and the rapid evolution it has enabled. Access to open-source code lets us reversion, refine, enhance, and scale programs quickly and exponentially — it’s a font of collective knowledge that fuels a whirlwind of computational advancement.

  • OpenStack and Open Source MANO: Technologies for NFV Deployment

    We have experienced how open source software technologies revolutionized the application development process, which ultimately resulted in digital transformation across various industry verticals. Open source technologies now are disrupting the telecom sector for building 5G internet, which will be powered by network functions virtualization (NFV) and software defined networking (SDN). With NFV and SDN, multiple network functions and control and management operations in telecom networks will be software-driven; enabling the cloud-native and DevOps approach.

  • 5 golden rules for working openly with difficult people

    Sometimes these personalities can rub each other the wrong way, generate conflict, and be difficult to work with. Some of these people can be unclear in their expectations, overreact to relatively benign scenarios, and be unreliable. They can be your founders, executives, team-mates, other team members, or people who report to you. In many cases, people handle these challenging personalities in a sub-optimal way. They get distracted by the ego and emotion in the situation as opposed to focusing on clear, productive outcomes and building lasting trust.

  • Engaging young people: How to include positive youth participation in our free software community
  • OSCON's 20th anniversary and more

    The O'Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) returned to Portland, Oregon this July for the 20th convocation of this venerable gathering. While some of the program focused on retrospectives, there were also talks and tutorials on multiple technical topics and open-source community management. To give you a feel for the whole conference, we will explore it in a two-part article. This installment will cover a retrospective of open source and some presentations on releasing projects as open source at your organization. A second article will include a few of the technical topics at the conference.

  • Open Source Visual Studio Code Extension Helps Create Alexa Skills [Ed: Microsoft propagandist (for at least a decade)  David Ramel does openwashing for Microsoft and surveillance in the listening device (bug) sense]
  • Guy Martin: Open Source Strategy at Autodesk [Ed: You know that Autodesk, a proprietary software giant, has paid some 'slush funds' to Zemlin's LF. Why else would Swapnil Bhartiya do an openwashing piece for them? Using the money they funnel to Zemlin?]

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now Available to Download

After six months in development, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) is now finally here, and you can download the ISO images right now for all official flavors, including Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio, for 64-bit and 32-bit architectures (only Lubuntu and Xubuntu). The Ubuntu Server edition is also out and it's supported on more hardware architectures than Ubuntu Desktop, including 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), IBM System z (s390x), PPC64el (Power PC 64-bit Little Endian), and Raspberry Pi 2/ARMhf. A live Ubuntu Server flavor is also available only for 64-bit computers. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 18.10 arrives

Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

In many geeky circles, single-board computers are popular machines. SBCs come in small form factors and generally run GNU/Linux, but unfortunately, many boards like the popular Raspberry Pi are dependent on proprietary software to use. The Free Software Foundation maintains a list of system-on-chip families, sorted by their freedom status. Unfortunately, this list had not been updated in several years. While it was accurate when it was published, free software is constantly improving. Today, more and more boards are usable with free software. On the graphical side, the Etnaviv project has reached maturity, and the Panfrost project, with which I have been personally involved, has sprung up. The video processing unit on Allwinner chips has been reverse-engineered and liberated by the linux-sunxi community in tandem with Bootlin. Rockchip boards have become viable competitors to their better known counterparts. Even the Raspberry Pi has had a proof-of-concept free firmware replacement developed. Free software is winning on ARM. Read more

PostgreSQL 11 released

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group today announced the release of PostgreSQL 11, the latest version of the world’s most advanced open source database. PostgreSQL 11 provides users with improvements to overall performance of the database system, with specific enhancements associated with very large databases and high computational workloads. Further, PostgreSQL 11 makes significant improvements to the table partitioning system, adds support for stored procedures capable of transaction management, improves query parallelism and adds parallelized data definition capabilities, and introduces just-in-time (JIT) compilation for accelerating the execution of expressions in queries. Read more Also: PostgreSQL 11.0 Released With Better Robustness, Performance Improvements

Stable kernels 4.18.15, 4.14.77 and 4.9.134