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Programming: State of Rust Survey and Python Development

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Development
  • Launching the 2018 State of Rust Survey

    It’s that time again! Time for us to take a look at how the Rust project is doing, and what we should plan for the future. The Rust Community Team is pleased to announce our 2018 State of Rust Survey! Whether or not you use Rust today, we want to know your opinions. Your responses will help the project understand its strengths and weaknesses and establish development priorities for the future.

    Completing this survey should take about 10 to 15 minutes and is anonymous unless you choose to give us your contact information. We will be accepting submissions until September 8th, and we will write up our findings a month or so afterwards to blog.rust-lang.org. You can see last year’s results here.

  • Perform robust unit tests with PyHamcrest

    At the base of the testing pyramid are unit tests. Unit tests test one unit of code at a time—usually one function or method.

    Often, a single unit test is designed to test one particular flow through a function, or a specific branch choice. This enables easy mapping of a unit test that fails and the bug that made it fail.

    Ideally, unit tests use few or no external resources, isolating them and making them faster.

  • Adding None-aware operators to Python?

    A PEP that has been around for a while, without being either accepted or rejected, was reintroduced recently on the python-ideas mailing list. PEP 505 ("None-aware operators") would provide some syntactic sugar, in the form of new operators, to handle cases where variables might be the special None value. It is a feature that other languages support, but has generally raised concerns about being "un-Pythonic" over the years. At this point, though, the Python project still needs to figure out how it will be governed—and how PEPs can be accepted or rejected.

  • The Grumpy Editor's Python 3 experience

    LWN has been running articles for years to the effect that the end of Python 2 is nigh and that code should be ported to Python 3 immediately. So, naturally, one might expect that our own site code, written in Python, had been forward-ported long ago. Strangely enough, that didn't actually happen. It has mostly happened now, though. In the process of doing this work, your editor has noticed a few things that don't necessarily appear in the numerous porting guides circulating on the net.

    One often-heard excuse for delaying this work is that one or more dependencies have not yet been ported to Python 3. For almost everybody, that excuse ran out of steam some time ago; if a module has not been forward-ported by now, it probably never will be and other plans need to be made. In our case, the final dependency was the venerable Quixote web framework which, due to the much appreciated work of Neil Schemenauer, was forward-ported at the end of 2017. Quixote never really took the world by storm, but it makes the task of creating a code-backed site easy; we would have been sad to have to leave it behind.

    Much of the anxiety around moving to Python 3 is focused on how that language handles strings. The ability to work with Unicode was kind of bolted onto Python 2, but it was designed into Python 3 from the beginning. The result is a strict separation between the string type (str), which holds text as Unicode code points, and bytes, which contains arbitrary data — including text in a specific encoding. Python 2 made it easy to be lazy and ignore that distinction much of the time; Python 3 requires a constant awareness of which kind of data is being dealt with.

More in Tux Machines

Kate/KTextEditor Picks Up Many Improvements To Enhance KDE Text Editing

Even with KDE's annual Akademy conference happening this past week in Vienna, KDE development has been going strong especially on the usability front. The Kate text editor and the KTextEditor component within KDE Frameworks 5 have been the largest benefactors of recent improvements. This KDE text editing code now has support for disabling syntax highlighting entirely if preferred. When using syntax highlighting, there have been many KTextEditor enhancements to improve the experience as well as improvements to the highlighting for a variety of languages from JavaScript to YAML to AppArmor files. Read more

KStars v2.9.8 released

KStars 2.9.8 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. It is a hotfix release that contains bug fixes and stability improvements over the last release. Read more Also: KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?

today's leftovers and howtos

  • Project curl governance
    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level. We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that. Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.
  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes
    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5. Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32
    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!
  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working
    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.
  • Gentoo on Integricloud
    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le. Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost. Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.
  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake
    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion. The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)
  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

Red Hat and Fedora News