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GNU/Linux Leftovers

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  • Five-or-More Modernisation: Now You Can Properly Play It

    As Google Summer of Code is officially drawing to an end, all of my attention was focused towards making the Five or More Vala version feature-complete. As you probably already know from my previous blog post, the game was somehow playable at that time, but it was missing some of the key features included in the old version.

    So what’s new this time? First and foremost, you can surely notice the game board now sports a grid, which wasn’t there until now. On the same note, there are also animations used for clicking a piece on the board, for an improved gaming experience. For further accessibility, some header bar hints are available at different stages in the game: at the start of any new game, at the end of each game, as well as whenever there is no clear path between the initial position and the cell indicated by the user for the current move.

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

    The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

    The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

    This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

  • Lucas Kanashiro: DebCamp and DebConf 18 summary

    Come as no surprise, Debcamp and Debconf 18 were amazing! I worked on many things that I had not had enough time to accomplish before; also I had the opportunity to meet old friends and new people. Finally, I engaged in important discussions regarding the Debian project.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 07 August 2018

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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10: What’s New? [Video]

But how do you follow up the brilliant Bionic Beaver? It’s far from being an easy task and, alas, the collected changes you’ll find accrued in the ‘Cosmic Cuttlefish’ are of the “down-to-earth” variety rather than the “out-of-this-world” ones you might’ve been hoping for. But don’t take our word for it; find out yourself by watching our Ubuntu 18.10 video (and it’s best watched with headphones because, ahem, I can level sound properly). In 3 minute and 18 seconds we whizz you through everything that’s new, neat and noticeable in Ubuntu 18.10. Read more

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