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Programming: Licensing FUD, NASA, Rust and Curl

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Development
  • Dual Licensing for Open Source Components: Yeah or Meh? [Ed: Microsoft partner speaks out against GPL or spreads fear, as usual]
  • Flexera Adds Big Automation Boost to Open Source Software Scanning, Compliance and Protection
  • NASA wants you to build your own Mars rover

    It's just not practical for a private citizen to own an actual car-sized NASA Mars rover, as cool as that would be. But with an assist from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, you can build a mini version to explore your own backyard.

    The JPL Open Source Rover Project tells you everything you need to know to build a scaled-down rover. 

    While the actual Curiosity rover cost into the billions in US dollars, NASA estimates you can makes its mini-me for about $2,500 (£1,900, AU$3,400) using off-the-shelf parts. JPL published the detailed open-source design on GitHub.

  • Explore New Worlds With JPL's Open Source Rover

    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Mars rovers have a special place in my heart. I loved seeing pictures of Sojourner nuzzling up to rocks, and I still wonder whether it managed to drive around the Pathfinder lander after contact was lost. Spirit going silent was heartbreaking, and Opportunity continues to inspire so far beyond its expected lifetime, even as a dust storm threatens to starve it to death. And I particularly remember thinking how insane it was that Curiosity was going to drop onto the surface from a hovering robotic sky crane (!), and then being entirely overwhelmed to watch it happen flawlessly from the media room at JPL.

  • This Week in Rust 246
  • Daniel Stenberg: much faster curl uploads on Windows with a single tiny commit

    These days, operating system kernels provide TCP/IP stacks that can do really fast network transfers. It's not even unusual for ordinary people to have gigabit connections at home and of course we want our applications to be able take advantage of them.

    I don't think many readers here will be surprised when I say that fulfilling this desire turns out much easier said than done in the Windows world.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist