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Programming: Licensing FUD, NASA, Rust and Curl

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Development
  • Dual Licensing for Open Source Components: Yeah or Meh? [Ed: Microsoft partner speaks out against GPL or spreads fear, as usual]
  • Flexera Adds Big Automation Boost to Open Source Software Scanning, Compliance and Protection
  • NASA wants you to build your own Mars rover

    It's just not practical for a private citizen to own an actual car-sized NASA Mars rover, as cool as that would be. But with an assist from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, you can build a mini version to explore your own backyard.

    The JPL Open Source Rover Project tells you everything you need to know to build a scaled-down rover. 

    While the actual Curiosity rover cost into the billions in US dollars, NASA estimates you can makes its mini-me for about $2,500 (£1,900, AU$3,400) using off-the-shelf parts. JPL published the detailed open-source design on GitHub.

  • Explore New Worlds With JPL's Open Source Rover

    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Mars rovers have a special place in my heart. I loved seeing pictures of Sojourner nuzzling up to rocks, and I still wonder whether it managed to drive around the Pathfinder lander after contact was lost. Spirit going silent was heartbreaking, and Opportunity continues to inspire so far beyond its expected lifetime, even as a dust storm threatens to starve it to death. And I particularly remember thinking how insane it was that Curiosity was going to drop onto the surface from a hovering robotic sky crane (!), and then being entirely overwhelmed to watch it happen flawlessly from the media room at JPL.

  • This Week in Rust 246
  • Daniel Stenberg: much faster curl uploads on Windows with a single tiny commit

    These days, operating system kernels provide TCP/IP stacks that can do really fast network transfers. It's not even unusual for ordinary people to have gigabit connections at home and of course we want our applications to be able take advantage of them.

    I don't think many readers here will be surprised when I say that fulfilling this desire turns out much easier said than done in the Windows world.

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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10: What’s New? [Video]

But how do you follow up the brilliant Bionic Beaver? It’s far from being an easy task and, alas, the collected changes you’ll find accrued in the ‘Cosmic Cuttlefish’ are of the “down-to-earth” variety rather than the “out-of-this-world” ones you might’ve been hoping for. But don’t take our word for it; find out yourself by watching our Ubuntu 18.10 video (and it’s best watched with headphones because, ahem, I can level sound properly). In 3 minute and 18 seconds we whizz you through everything that’s new, neat and noticeable in Ubuntu 18.10. Read more

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