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Mugshot 0.4.1 Released

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Software

Mugshot 0.4.1, the latest release of the lightweight user profile editor, is now available! This release includes a number of bug fixes and will now run in the most minimal of environments.

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More in Tux Machines

Official TV HAT brings DVB-T2 streaming to the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has launched a Raspberry Pi TV HAT with a Sony CXD2880 TV tuner for receiving DVB-T2 transmissions in Europe. The $21.50 board debuts a half-size HAT format. The computer that was born to empower technology education in the UK can now be rejiggered into an old-fashioned idiot box. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has produced an official HAT add-on board for the Raspberry Pi with a Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) tuner that receives terrestrial TV signals. The $21.50 Raspberry Pi TV HAT lets you stream DTV-T2 and DTV-T video in the UK and Europe. Read more

today's howtos

A Bright Spotlight on elementary OS 5.0

It's really bright. elementary OS 5.0 is the best release so far by mainly it's AppCenter uniqueness and richest of desktop features ever among the prior releases. The thing I love the most is the fact that elementary OS developers contribute greatly to our community which we didn't see anything like that before: they created a new software distribution platform similar to what we previously saw on Apple macOS, except it's for free/libre open source software, by allowing app developers to get paid directly by the users (with the so-called "pay-what-you-want" system). elementary OS is popular, as you may see on Distrowatch, so we can expect bright future for the health of its apps market (and hope more developers getting attracted to join). The desktop is really usable, the shortcut keys are visible (by pressing Super key) and customizable, its enhanced with parental control as well as Night Light, the apps are plenty and still growing in numbers, plus it's compatible with Ubuntu 18.04 so you can install thousands of packages if you wish right now. I can run it really smooth on an Intel 967 CPU with 4GB RAM (Intel Graphics). I hope it will be smoother on your systems. I wish this quick review of mine helps you a lot to get attracted to elementary OS and soon be a happy user. Read more

Graphics: Open-Source Qualcomm Graphics Support, Advances in Mesa Continuous Integration and Status Update for Virgl

  • Open-Source Qualcomm Graphics Support Continues Flourishing With Freedreno
    When it comes to open-source ARM graphics drivers, the Raspberry Pi / VC4 effort and Freedreno continue to be the two best examples of fully open-source graphics driver coverage including 3D support. Freedreno has been attracting contributions from Qualcomm / CodeAurora in what started out as solely a community reverse-engineered effort and with the latest-generation Adreno 600 series hardware the open-source support is in great shape.
  • Advances in Mesa continuous integration
    Continuous integration (CI) has become increasingly prevalent in open-source projects over the last few years. Intel has been active in building CI systems for graphics, both for the kernel side and for the Mesa-based user-space side of the equation. Mark Janes and Clayton Craft gave a presentation on Intel's Mesa CI system at the 2018 X.Org Developers Conference (XDC), which was held in A Coruña, Spain in late September. The Mesa CI system is one of the earliest successful CI initiatives in open source that he knows of, Janes said. It is a core component of Mesa development, especially at Intel. Like many companies, Intel is a large organization with an "old school development model". He likened it to a Roman army, where there are legions that are made up of smaller groups, each of which has procedures for all of its activities; tents are set up and arranged the same way each time. When Intel first encountered Mesa development, it was something of a shock. There were no architects in the group, but the Mesa developers were simply running right through the Intel army.
  • A status update for virgl
    At the 2018 X.Org Developers Conference, Elie Tournier gave an update on the state of the Virgil (or virgl) virtual 3D GPU for QEMU. He looked at the project's history along with what has happened with it over the last year or so. As is usual in a status update talk, he finished with some thoughts about future plans for virgl. For the last year, Tournier has been working on virgl for Collabora. Virgil began as a Dave Airlie side project four or five years ago. Tournier recommended a YouTube video of a 2014 linux.conf.au talk that Airlie gave as a good starting point. It is meant to be a way for guests running in a virtual machine (VM) to access the host GPU using OpenGL and other APIs. It is based on Gallium3D, because Airlie was familiar with that architecture, Tournier said. It has reached the stage where it is ready for use in products. A company is currently building a project using it; in addition, QEMU is using virgl to allow Windows guests to access the GPU. Overall, virgl is in pretty good shape, he said.