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Games: Gallium3D, SpaceBourne, Dead Matter, The Procession to Calvary, Kubifaktorium, Twilight Struggle

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Gaming
  • Marek Tackles EXT_gpu_shader4 Support In Gallium3D For Old Games/Apps

    While the EXT_gpu_shader4 extension was written for the OpenGL 2.0 days a decade ago when the GeForce 8 series was NVIDIA's flagship products, AMD's Marek Olšák is now adding support for this extension to the Gallium3D drivers.

    GL_EXT_gpu_shader4 is an extension NVIDIA developed back in the GL2 era for adding a number of features to GLSL back at a time when OpenGL wasn't advancing as rapidly. EXT_gpu_shader4 added new texture lookup functions, signed/unsigned integer support, new built-in functions, and more. But OpenGL 3.0 ended up incorporating the EXT_gpu_shader4 additions into the core specification.

  • SpaceBourne might see a Linux version, according to demand after release

    SpaceBourne [Official Site] will be an open space exploration game with RPG elements, as the description on Steam states. It should release for Windows later this month.

    It's based on the Unreal Engine 4, and as we know with Everspace and RUINER, Linux versions that are looking gorgeous and have great performance are doable, even though not straight forward to create.

  • Dead Matter, a sandbox survival horror plans to have a Linux release after Early Access

    I seriously cannot get enough of survival games, so hearing about Dead Matter [Official Site] is quite exciting as it sounds pretty good. While we already have 7 Days to Die which has a similar theme, the graphical style leaves a lot to be desired and it looks like Dead Matter is graphically much more impressive.

  • The Procession to Calvary is a point and click adventure made from Renaissance-era paintings

    This looks all kinds of nuts. A point and click adventure game planned to release for Linux that's made from Renaissance-era paintings and public domain recordings of classical music.

  • Build and manage a colony in Kubifaktorium, developed primarily on Linux and funding on Kickstarter

    Kubifaktorium [Official Site, Kickstarter] from developer Mirko Seithe (previously made BossConstructor) is a colony building and management sim that mixes in automation and transports systems like Factorio.

    At its heart, it's a city-builder with you farming crops, crafting tools and weapons but it also has you craft some more advanced machines to automate your colony like trains, farming machines, conveyor belts to move resources around, zeppelins and so on. For anyone who has played Factorio, elements of it certainly look a bit familiar while still being rather different with you taking care of your colonists needs.

  • An update on the Linux version of Twilight Struggle, four years after the Kickstarter

    Way back in July of 2014, GMT Games partnered with Playdek and ran a successful Kickstarter for Twilight Struggle, a digital version of the board game that shares the same name. It promised Linux support, which still hasn't been delivered.

    A user wrote in to ask us to find out what's going on, since the game released on Steam back in April of 2016 and there's still no sign of the Linux version.

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

Mozilla/Firefox: Reducing Your Online Annoyances, This Week in Servo Development and Vista 10 Integration

  • Today’s Firefox Aims to Reduce Your Online Annoyances
    Almost a hundred years ago, John Maynard Keyes suggested that the industrial revolution would effectively end work for humans within a couple of generations, and our biggest challenge would be figuring what to do with that time. That definitely hasn’t happened, and we always seem to have lots to do, much of it online. When you’re on the web, you’re trying to get stuff done, and therefore online annoyances are just annoyances. Whether it’s autoplaying videos, page jumps or finding a topic within all your multiple tabs, Firefox can help. Today’s Firefox release minimizes those online inconveniences, and puts you back in control.
  • This Week In Servo 127
    In the past week, we merged 50 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.
  • Passwordless Web Authentication Support via Windows Hello
    Firefox 66, being released this week, supports using the Windows Hello feature for Web Authentication on Windows 10, enabling a passwordless experience on the web that is hassle-free and more secure. Firefox has supported Web Authentication for all desktop platforms since version 60, but Windows 10 marks our first platform to support the new FIDO2 “passwordless” capabilities for Web Authentication.

Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: 3D Printers

One interesting thing about the hobbyist 3D printing market is that it was founded on free software and open hardware ideals starting with the RepRap project. The idea behind that project was to design a 3D printer from off-the-shelf parts that could print as many of its own parts as possible (especially more complex, custom parts like gears). Because of this, the first generation of 3D printers were all homemade using Arduinos, stepper motors, 3D-printed gears and hardware you could find in the local hardware store. As the movement grew, a few individuals started small businesses selling 3D printer kits that collected all the hardware plus the 3D printed parts and electronics for you to assemble at home. Later, these kits turned into fully assembled and supported printers, and after the successful Printrbot kickstarter campaign, the race was on to create cheaper and more user-friendly printers with each iteration. Sites like Thingiverse and YouMagine allowed people to create and share their designs, so even if you didn't have any design skills yourself, you could download and print everyone else's. These sites even provided the hardware diagrams for some of the more popular 3D printers. The Free Software ethos was everywhere you looked. Read more