Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Toshiba RC100 NVMe SSD Ubuntu Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Back in June Toshiba introduced the RC100 NVMe solid-state drive as a new low-end offering. The RC100 is now a bit blindsided by Intel's just-launched 660p SSD that delivers incredible storage capacities per dollar, and I'll have some Intel 660p Linux benchmarks in a few days, but for those curious about the RC100 here are some Ubuntu Linux benchmark results for this low-cost NVMe SSD.

The Toshiba RC100 is a Ball Grid Array (BGA) SSD with the controller and flash memory on a single package. With that the RC100 NVMe SSDs are single-sided and fit on an M.2 2242 PCB rather than the longer and more common M.2 2280 NVMe SSDs. But with being M.2 2242 is limited to PCI Express x2 lanes rather than x4 bandwidth. The RC100 doesn't have any DRAM cache but does support NVMe Host Memory Buffer (HMB) and the drive uses 64 layer BiCS3 3D TLC NAND flash memory.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now Available to Download

After six months in development, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) is now finally here, and you can download the ISO images right now for all official flavors, including Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio, for 64-bit and 32-bit architectures (only Lubuntu and Xubuntu). The Ubuntu Server edition is also out and it's supported on more hardware architectures than Ubuntu Desktop, including 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), IBM System z (s390x), PPC64el (Power PC 64-bit Little Endian), and Raspberry Pi 2/ARMhf. A live Ubuntu Server flavor is also available only for 64-bit computers. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 18.10 arrives

Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

In many geeky circles, single-board computers are popular machines. SBCs come in small form factors and generally run GNU/Linux, but unfortunately, many boards like the popular Raspberry Pi are dependent on proprietary software to use. The Free Software Foundation maintains a list of system-on-chip families, sorted by their freedom status. Unfortunately, this list had not been updated in several years. While it was accurate when it was published, free software is constantly improving. Today, more and more boards are usable with free software. On the graphical side, the Etnaviv project has reached maturity, and the Panfrost project, with which I have been personally involved, has sprung up. The video processing unit on Allwinner chips has been reverse-engineered and liberated by the linux-sunxi community in tandem with Bootlin. Rockchip boards have become viable competitors to their better known counterparts. Even the Raspberry Pi has had a proof-of-concept free firmware replacement developed. Free software is winning on ARM. Read more