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Applications: Kodi, Qalculate, Kiwi TCMS, DocBook

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  • 8 Best Kodi Repositories For Downloading Popular Addons

    With online streaming becoming popular by the day, there has been a rise in the portals and apps that allow you to stream content in a hassle-free manner. Now, to watch the content from different sources, you would need a centralized media player and this is where Kodi comes into the picture.

    Kodi has been one of the most popular and talked about open source media center and rightly so. The XBMC owned media center allows you to stream all types of content including videos, music, games, etc. on devices running on different platforms.

  • Qalculate! – An Open-Source Multi-Purpose Calculator

    Qalculate! is a robust cross-platform desktop calculator that is simple to use and equally capable of performing complex math calculations as well as other calculative tasks like percentage calculation and currency conversion.

    What is awesome about Qalculate! is that it works with a library that features tons of customizable functions which make it excellent at unit conversions, plotting graphs, interval arithmetic, and symbolic calculations like differentiation, among other math problems.

    Qalculate! is also capable of keeping the history of your calculations, a feature that comes in handy when making lengthy calculations or solving long math problems (typical of Calculus).

    When you launch Qalculate! you will notice its straightforward workflow. It has a typical menu bar with file, edit, and help options. The other options are for setting the mode you want the app to be in while you use it, the variables you will be working with, and the units.

  • Kiwi TCMS 5.2

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 5.2! This release introduces new database migrations and converts the Docker image to a non-root user with uid 1001. You may have to adjust ownership/permissions on the kiwi_uploads Docker volume!

  • DocBook – markup language for technical documentation

    DocBook is a semantic markup language for writing structured documents using XML (or SGML). It was originally intended for writing technical documents related to computer hardware and software but it can be used for any other sort of documentation. The language is fairly easy to learn; its strength derives from its flexibility.

    DocBook enables you to author and store document content in a presentation-neutral form that captures the logical structure of the content. The XML files describe the document layout, paragraph division and other attributes. XML file structure may look familiar to HTML code. XML tends to be an improvement over the older HTML specification and can be used to produce complete web pages and other markup documents.

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Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

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PostgreSQL 11 released

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Stable kernels 4.18.15, 4.14.77 and 4.9.134