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Can You Get By with a Chromebook in College?

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GNU
Linux
Google

When heading off to college, finding the right laptop for your money is a challenge—you don’t want to spend more than you have to, but not having enough laptop is arguably worse. That’s what makes Chromebooks so appealing.

Chromebooks have a relatively low entry point for everything they offer. Since the operating system is so lightweight, even modest hardware can keep everything running nice and snappy. Where a Windows laptop for a similar price can get bogged down quickly, a Chromebook will often remain zippy even during heavier use.

Given the low price point and very usable performance, Chromebooks are often looked at by college students—but it may not be that straightforward. There are several things to think about before jumping right into a Chromebook to make sure it’s the right choice for you.

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5 best Chromebooks for school in 2018

  • 5 best Chromebooks for school in 2018

    Some people still think you need a Windows PC or an Apple device for school. That's so not true. But you don't have to take my word for it. By FutureSource's count, 59.6 percent of K-12 schools bought Chromebooks in 2017. You should too.

    It's easy to see why. While Microsoft is pushing its new cheap Surface Go, there are many great inexpensive Chromebook available for a few hundred dollars. Apple? Its first real mass market may have been in education, but it's been decades since the Apple II arrived. No, today's education market belongs to the Chromebook.

    As as FutureSource pointed out, Chromebooks combine "affordable devices, productivity tools via G-Suite, easy integration with third-party platforms/tools, task management/distribution via Google Classroom, and easy device management remains extremely popular with US teachers and IT buyers alike."

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