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LibreOffice 6.1

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  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.1, a major release which shows the power of a large and diverse community of contributors

    LibreOffice 6.1’s new features have been developed by a large community of code contributors: 72% of commits are from developers employed by companies sitting in the Advisory Board like Collabora, Red Hat and CIB and by other contributors such as SIL and Pardus, and 28% are from individual volunteers.

    In addition, there is a global community of individual volunteers taking care of other fundamental activities such as quality assurance, software localization, user interface design and user experience, editing of help system text and documentation, plus free software and open document standards advocacy at a local level.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Shipping Today As A Big Update For This Open-Source Office Suite

    LibreOffice 6.1 will officially be hitting the web in a short time as the latest major feature release to this newest cross-platform, open-source office suite.

    Since LibreOffice 6.0 shipped in January, many improvements have went into making LibreOffice 6.1 an even greater release. Found with LibreOffice 6.1 is better KDE integration as well as continued GTK3/GNOME improvements, Microsoft file importing enhancements for Excel and other Microsoft Office products, improved image handling, a new database engine, various enhancements for Libreoffice Online, better EPUB exporting, support for parallel formula evaluation on the CPU, other speed optimizations like greater VLOOKUP performance for Calc, various localization work, and more.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The Document Foundation announced today the official release and general availability for download of the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, the second major update of the LibreOffice 6 series introduced in early 2018, for all supported platforms.

    LibreOffice 6.1 has been in development for the past six months and it's not ready to conquer your Linux, Mac, or Windows office workstations with new features like revamped image handling functionality that's significantly faster and smoother, especially when opening documents created in Microsoft Office.

    LibreOffice 6.1 also adds a new Page menu and re-organizes the menus of the Draw component for better consistency across the different modules, improves the EPUB export filter with additional options for customizing metadata and better support for links, images, tables, footnotes, and embedded fonts.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Released With New Colibre Icon Theme, Native Gtk3 Dialogs, Improved EPUB Export

    The Document Foundation announced LibreOffice 6.1 today, a release which includes a new icon theme called Colibre, native Gtk3 dialogs (if the Gtk3 backend is used), faster image handling, improved EPUB export, and more.

    The free and open source office suite LibreOffice 6.1 includes a new icon theme, called Colibre, with this release. The icon theme is based on Microsoft's icon design guidelines, and its purpose is to make the application more visually appealing to users coming from the Windows environment. Calibre is set as the default icon theme on Windows.

LibreOffice 6.1 Released

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Released For Windows, Linux, macOS: Brings New Icon Style, Improved Image Handler

    After waiting for almost half a year, The Document Foundation has finally pushed the first point release for LibreOffice 6. The latest update LibreOffice 6.1 is important in the sense it packs a plethora of big features.

    The update brings performance improvement when loading proprietary Microsoft formats. It has a new graphics manager and an improved image lifecycle that makes image loading in documents better. The background image dialog has been redesigned to make it easier to use.

LibreOffice 6.1 Released with ‘Major Changes’

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Released with ‘Major Changes’

    You can now download LibreOffice 6.1, the latest stable release of the super popular open source office suite. LibreOffice 6.1 is billed as “a major release” in the ‘fresh’ series and features numerous user interface tweaks, improved documentation and help, and is said to be more compatible with Microsoft Office files than ever before.

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