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What The Future Holds? You Are More A Part of it Than You Know.

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GNU
Linux

But when it came down to it, the core of the class settled on Cinnamon as their DE of choice. Possibly because it was the closest thing to Windows for them? Maybe. Or as one student noted, "it gives me what I want without having to go looking for it." And it doesn't hurt that it's easy on the eyes. My Cinnamon desktop with the joy-blue controls theme.

Now, I do have some quibbles with Cinnamon. I'm all about customization. I tried the latest Kubuntu, as I like the theming options KDE gives me; but so much has changed within that structure, I just can't get it to the level of aesthetics I achieved with KDE4. My problems with Cinnamon are silly to some. I like to be able to change the icons in my system tray. Unfortunately, those seem to be fixed. And yeah, there's Mate. Mate allows those changes but try as I may, and again this is just me; but when I've done all that I can do with my Mate Desktop, it still looks like 2003.

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Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

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PostgreSQL 11 released

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