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today's leftovers

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  • Episode 34 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux: Linus Torvalds gave his opinion on Wireguard, Lubuntu Takes a New Direction, LineageOS launches their annual Summer Survey, and Hiri’s Experience with Selling on Linux. Then we’ll check out some distro news from Slackware, OpenWRT, Ubuntu LTS, and RebeccaBlackOS. Later in the show, we’ll look at the new NetSpectre vulnerability varient, Forbes’ 5 Reasons to Switch to Linux, a really interesting blog post from the KDE Team about Plasma’s Engineering and finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • 14 must-read tech newsletters
  • Building more trustful teams in four steps

    Robin Dreeke's The Code of Trust is a helpful guide to developing trustful relationships, and it's particularly useful to people working in open organizations (where trust is fundamental to any kind of work). As its title implies, Dreeke's book presents a "code" or set of principles people can follow when attempting to establish trust. I explained those in the first installment of this review. In this article, then, I'll outline what Dreeke (a former FBI agent) calls "The Four Steps to Inspiring Trust"—a set of practices for enacting the principles. In other words, the Steps make the Code work in the real world.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2018
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #8

    Here is the eighth issue of This Week in Lubuntu Development. You can read the last issue here.

  • Ikea’s ‘open source’ Delaktig sofa is designed to be built and rebuilt again and again
  • UF/IFAS researchers to develop open-source library for farmers
  • BBC Wants Microsoft to Expose ‘Doctor Who’ Leaker

    New court documents suggest that the BBC has yet to find the source of the leaked 'Doctor Who' footage that previously appeared online. The British company is hoping that Microsoft can help. At a federal court in Washington, the BBC requested a DMCA subpoena targeted at a OneDrive user who shared the infringing material online late June.

  • Surface Go racks up another terrible iFixit repairability score for Microsoft

    But the iFixit team has slightly different criteria. Is it self-repairable? The answer is a big wet sloppy ‘no'.

  • [Older] MDT-9100T

    Several Motorola MDT-9100T "Mobile Data Terminals" came up on eBay and their retro-future design was too neat to pass up. The stylish housing combined with an aperture-less amber CRT looks like something slipped from the Fallout or BladeRunner universe into our own. Some of us at NYC Resistor bought them and are repurposing them.

    [...]

    In order to replace the i386 with a BeagleBone Black it was necessary to build an adapter board that plugs into the ribbon cable, deduce the VGA timings and write a Device Tree overlay (DTBO) to configure the LVDS framing for the special screen, and design a USB HID keyboard interface for the keyboard and function keys.

  • SMS Two-Factor Auth Isn’t Perfect, But You Should Still Use It

    In a quest for perfect security, the perfect is the enemy of the good. People are criticizing SMS-based two-factor authentication in the wake of the Reddit hack, but using SMS-based two factor is still much better than not using two-factor authentication at all.

More in Tux Machines

Intel Preparing The Linux Kernel For Cascade Lake AP Multi-Die Support

Intel developers have begun posting their Linux kernel patches for enabling multi-die/package topology support to the Linux kernel as part of their Cascade Lake AP upbringing. Cascade Lake "Advanced Performance" is a multi-chip package of multiple Cascade Lake dies, expected to be up to 48 cores / 96 threads per package and twelve DDR4 memory channels. Cascade Lake SP and Cascade Lake X Linux support already has been in order -- or at least appears to be based upon previous commit activity -- while Cascade Lake AP is taking some additional work due to the new multi-die design. Cascade Lake dies are connected via Ultra Path Interconnect (UPI) links. Read more Also: Linux Seeing Support For The HyperBus

Wayland 1.17 & Weston 6.0 Reach Alpha, Officially Releasing Next Month

Out today are the first alpha releases for Wayland 1.17 and the Weston 6.0 reference compositor. This alpha release is about two weeks behind schedule but the developers have updated their plans to now ship the beta releases on 5 March, release candidates begin on 12 March, and potentially releasing the stable versions of Wayland 1.17.0 and Weston 6.0.0 on 19 March. The Wayland 1.17 Alpha release adds to the protocol support for expressing an internal server error message as well as an updated wl_seat protocol. There are also memory leak fixes for the Wayland scanner and various test updates. Details on the 1.17 alpha via wayland-devel. Also out today is the Weston 6.0 Alpha. On the Weston compositor front they have shifted to using the Meson build system while deprecating Autotools, XDG-Shell stable support, FreeRDP 2.0 updates, IVI shell improvements, and many other changes. Read more

NVIDIA 418.31.03 Linux Driver

Linux-powered robot kit aims for sweet spot between pro and kid products

Vincross has launched a Kickstarter campaign for a modular “MIND Kit” robotics kit ranging from $89 for the Linux-driven, quad -A53 compute unit to $799 for a complete kit with servo controller, motors, battery, bases, sensors, lidar, and a mic array. Vincross, which was founded in 2014 by Tsinghua University AI scientist Tianqi Sun, went to Kickstarter last year to launch its six-legged, all-terrain HEXA robot, controlled by a Linux-based MIND SDK. Now, the company has returned with a smarter and more modular MIND Kit robotics kit with an updated MIND 2.0 SDK. The company also announced a $10 funding round led by Lenovo (see farther below). Read more