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today's leftovers

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  • Episode 34 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux: Linus Torvalds gave his opinion on Wireguard, Lubuntu Takes a New Direction, LineageOS launches their annual Summer Survey, and Hiri’s Experience with Selling on Linux. Then we’ll check out some distro news from Slackware, OpenWRT, Ubuntu LTS, and RebeccaBlackOS. Later in the show, we’ll look at the new NetSpectre vulnerability varient, Forbes’ 5 Reasons to Switch to Linux, a really interesting blog post from the KDE Team about Plasma’s Engineering and finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • 14 must-read tech newsletters
  • Building more trustful teams in four steps

    Robin Dreeke's The Code of Trust is a helpful guide to developing trustful relationships, and it's particularly useful to people working in open organizations (where trust is fundamental to any kind of work). As its title implies, Dreeke's book presents a "code" or set of principles people can follow when attempting to establish trust. I explained those in the first installment of this review. In this article, then, I'll outline what Dreeke (a former FBI agent) calls "The Four Steps to Inspiring Trust"—a set of practices for enacting the principles. In other words, the Steps make the Code work in the real world.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2018
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #8

    Here is the eighth issue of This Week in Lubuntu Development. You can read the last issue here.

  • Ikea’s ‘open source’ Delaktig sofa is designed to be built and rebuilt again and again
  • UF/IFAS researchers to develop open-source library for farmers
  • BBC Wants Microsoft to Expose ‘Doctor Who’ Leaker

    New court documents suggest that the BBC has yet to find the source of the leaked 'Doctor Who' footage that previously appeared online. The British company is hoping that Microsoft can help. At a federal court in Washington, the BBC requested a DMCA subpoena targeted at a OneDrive user who shared the infringing material online late June.

  • Surface Go racks up another terrible iFixit repairability score for Microsoft

    But the iFixit team has slightly different criteria. Is it self-repairable? The answer is a big wet sloppy ‘no'.

  • [Older] MDT-9100T

    Several Motorola MDT-9100T "Mobile Data Terminals" came up on eBay and their retro-future design was too neat to pass up. The stylish housing combined with an aperture-less amber CRT looks like something slipped from the Fallout or BladeRunner universe into our own. Some of us at NYC Resistor bought them and are repurposing them.

    [...]

    In order to replace the i386 with a BeagleBone Black it was necessary to build an adapter board that plugs into the ribbon cable, deduce the VGA timings and write a Device Tree overlay (DTBO) to configure the LVDS framing for the special screen, and design a USB HID keyboard interface for the keyboard and function keys.

  • SMS Two-Factor Auth Isn’t Perfect, But You Should Still Use It

    In a quest for perfect security, the perfect is the enemy of the good. People are criticizing SMS-based two-factor authentication in the wake of the Reddit hack, but using SMS-based two factor is still much better than not using two-factor authentication at all.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: ONAP, the Joint Development Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

  • Linux Foundation's ONAP 'Casablanca' Enables 5G Management
    Today’s topics include the Linux Foundation adding new features to ONAP Casablanca for 5G enablement, and Censys raising seed money to expand internet scanning for threat hunting. The Linux Foundation's LF Networking project group last week took the next step in delivering an open-source platform to enable telecom providers to deploy next-generation network services.
  • The Joint Development Foundation Joins the Linux Foundation Family to Drive Adoption of Open Source and Standards
    The Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation today announced an agreement to bring the Joint Development Foundation into the Linux Foundation family to make it easier to collaborate through both open source and standards development. The Joint Development Foundation is a nonprofit that provides a “standards organization in a box” to enable groups to quickly establish projects. With today’s news, the Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation plan to provide greater capabilities for communities to engage in open source and standards development to speed industry adoption. “Linux Foundation communities have been engaged in developing open standards and specifications around Linux since day one and more recently with newer efforts such as OpenChain and the Open Container Initiative to collectively solve technical challenges,” said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation. “Leveraging the capabilities of the Joint Development Foundation will enable us to provide open source projects with another path to standardization, driving greater industry adoption of standards and specifications to speed adoption.”
  • How CNCF Is Growing the Cloud Landscape at KubeCon
    Thousands of developers, vendors and end users alike are descending on Seattle from Dec. 11-13 for the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event. They are all here to learn and talk about the growing cloud native landscape, anchored by the Kubernetes container orchestration system. Among those at KubeCon is Chris Aniszczyk, Chief Operating Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). In a video interview with eWEEK, Aniszczyk provides insight into the KubeCon event as well as highlighting the current and future direction of the CNCF, which now hosts 31 different open-source efforts. [...] Aniszczyk is also particularly enthusiastic about the Envoy project, which was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic. Among the organizations that are now using Envoy are Square, Stripe, Amazon and Google.

today's howtos

Adobe and GNU/Linux

Android Leftovers