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Programming: JPL, PHP, .NET, Flexera, LLVM, GitHub Woes

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  • JPL releases plans for build-your-own Mars rover

    NASA's Curiosity lander touched down on the surface of Mars in August, 2012, and its rover payload rolled out shortly after to begin its meandering mission. While the intrepid explorer did its thing, NASA needed an educational project to help explain the technology and the mission to the general public. That role was filled by a scaled down version called ROV-E, and now tinkerers, students, part-time scientists and the rover curious can build their very own mini Mars rover for exploring backyard craters and vast garden mountain ranges.

  • PHP 7.3 Beta Benchmarks Showing Good Performance

    Following last week's PHP 7.3 beta release, which also marks the feature freeze for this next PHP7 update, I've been running some performance benchmarks on a couple different Linux systems.

    My latest PHP 7.3 benchmarks using the first beta copy jive with my earlier PHP 7.3 benchmarks showing this next PHP7 iteration being a nice evolution to the performance and continuing to run much better than during the PHP5 days.

  • 6 ways programmers from underrepresented countries can get ahead

    Becoming a programmer from an underrepresented community like Cameroon is tough. Many Africans don't even know what computer programming is—and a lot who do think it's only for people from Western or Asian countries.

    I didn't own a computer until I was 18, and I didn't start programming until I was a 19-year-old high school senior, and had to write a lot of code on paper because I couldn't be carrying my big desktop to school. I have learned a lot over the past five years as I've moved up the ladder to become a successful programmer from an underrepresented community. While these lessons are from my experience in Africa, many apply to other underrepresented communities, including women.

  • Microsoft Issues .NET Framework Fixes To Address July 10 Patch Problems [Ed: Microsoft software is so absolutely fantastic that it can break itself; article by longtime Microsoft booster doing 'damage control']
  • Flexera simplify OSS license compliance and vulnerability protection

    Flexera has released FlexNet Code 2018, according to their press release, this makes it easier for software suppliers to add a new layer of trust and transparency into their software supply chain.

    New functionality allows suppliers to analyse software assets and create an inventory Bill of Materials (BOM).

  • LLVM 7.0 RC1 Compiler Stack Available For Testing

    While the sources have been tagged in Git for several days now, the binaries are now available too with LLVM 7.0 RC1 now officially being announced.

    Hans Wennborg has announced the availability of LLVM 7.0 RC1, including sub-projects like Clang 7.0 RC1. Downloads of LLVM 7.0 RC1 are available from here.

  • Developer Perception to Microsoft’s Acquisition of GitHub

    What contributors of Linux distributions and BSD families think

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now Available to Download

After six months in development, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) is now finally here, and you can download the ISO images right now for all official flavors, including Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio, for 64-bit and 32-bit architectures (only Lubuntu and Xubuntu). The Ubuntu Server edition is also out and it's supported on more hardware architectures than Ubuntu Desktop, including 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), IBM System z (s390x), PPC64el (Power PC 64-bit Little Endian), and Raspberry Pi 2/ARMhf. A live Ubuntu Server flavor is also available only for 64-bit computers. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 18.10 arrives

Single-board computer guide updated: Free software is winning on ARM!

In many geeky circles, single-board computers are popular machines. SBCs come in small form factors and generally run GNU/Linux, but unfortunately, many boards like the popular Raspberry Pi are dependent on proprietary software to use. The Free Software Foundation maintains a list of system-on-chip families, sorted by their freedom status. Unfortunately, this list had not been updated in several years. While it was accurate when it was published, free software is constantly improving. Today, more and more boards are usable with free software. On the graphical side, the Etnaviv project has reached maturity, and the Panfrost project, with which I have been personally involved, has sprung up. The video processing unit on Allwinner chips has been reverse-engineered and liberated by the linux-sunxi community in tandem with Bootlin. Rockchip boards have become viable competitors to their better known counterparts. Even the Raspberry Pi has had a proof-of-concept free firmware replacement developed. Free software is winning on ARM. Read more

PostgreSQL 11 released

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group today announced the release of PostgreSQL 11, the latest version of the world’s most advanced open source database. PostgreSQL 11 provides users with improvements to overall performance of the database system, with specific enhancements associated with very large databases and high computational workloads. Further, PostgreSQL 11 makes significant improvements to the table partitioning system, adds support for stored procedures capable of transaction management, improves query parallelism and adds parallelized data definition capabilities, and introduces just-in-time (JIT) compilation for accelerating the execution of expressions in queries. Read more Also: PostgreSQL 11.0 Released With Better Robustness, Performance Improvements

Stable kernels 4.18.15, 4.14.77 and 4.9.134