Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Researchers open source tools to identify Twitter bots at scale

Filed under
OSS
Security

Duo Security published technical research and methodology detailing how to identify automated Twitter accounts, known as bots, at a mass scale. Using machine learning algorithms to identify bot accounts across their dataset, Duo Labs researchers also unraveled a sophisticated cryptocurrency scam botnet consisting of at least 15,000 bots, and identified tactics used by malicious bots to appear legitimate and avoid detection, among other findings.

Read more

Also: Duo Security researchers’ Twitter ‘bot or not’ study unearths crypto botnet

Spot the Bot: Researchers Open-Source Tools to Hunt Twitter Bots

  • Spot the Bot: Researchers Open-Source Tools to Hunt Twitter Bots

    Their goal? To create a means of differentiating legitimate from automated accounts and detail the process so other researchers can replicate it.

    What makes Twitter bots tick? Two researchers from Duo Security wanted to find out, so they designed bot-chasing tools and techniques to separate automated accounts from real ones.

    Automated Twitter profiles have made headlines for spreading malware and influencing online opinion. Earlier research has dug into the process of creating Twitter datasets and finding potential bots, but none has discussed how researchers can find automated accounts on their own.

    Duo's Olabode Anise, data scientist, and Jordan Wright, principal R&D engineer, began their project to learn about how they could pinpoint characteristics of Twitter bots regardless of whether they were harmful. Hackers of all intentions can build bots and use them on Twitter.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Qt Creator 4.9 Beta released

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.9 Beta! There are many improvements and fixes included in Qt Creator 4.9. I’ll just mention some highlights in this blog post. Please refer to our change log for a more thorough overview. Read more

Hack Week - Browsersync integration for Online

Recently my LibreOffice work is mostly focused on the Online. It's nice to see how it is growing with new features and has better UI. But when I was working on improving toolbars (eg. folding menubar or reorganization of items) I noticed one annoying thing from the developer perspective. After every small change, I had to restart the server to provide updated content for the browser. It takes few seconds for switching windows, killing old server then running new one which requires some tests to be passed. Last week during the Hack Week funded by Collabora Productivity I was able to work on my own projects. It was a good opportunity for me to try to improve the process mentioned above. I've heard previously about browsersync so I decided to try it out. It is a tool which can automatically reload used .css and .js files in all browser sessions after change detection. To make it work browsersync can start proxy server watching files on the original server and sending events to the browser clients if needed. Read more

GNOME 3.32 Desktop Environment Gets a Second Beta Release, RC Lands March 6th

The GNOME 3.32 beta 2 release is here two weeks after the first beta version to add even more improvements and squash as many bugs as possible before the final release hits the streets next month. The second beta release of the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment also marks the beginning of the String Freeze development stage. Read more

Tumbleweed Snapshots Are Steadily Rolling

The latest snapshot of the week, 20190219, had more than a dozen packages updated. A new Kerberos database module using the Lightning Memory-Mapped Database library (LMDB) has was added with the krb5 1.17 package, which brought some major changes for the administration experience for the network authentication protocol Kerberos. The permissions package update 20190212 removed several old entries and the kernel-space and user-space code package tgt 1.0.74 fixed builds with the newer glibc. A couple xf86 packages were updated. The 1.4.0 version of xf86-video-chips was a bug fix release for X.Org Server. There was an X Server crash bug with the version 1.3 affecting devices older than the HiQVideo generation. The change log said the code may not compile against X Server 1.20 since it no longer supports 24-bit color. A few other YaST packages were updated in the snapshot like yast2-installation 4.1.36, which had an update that saves the used repositories at the end of installation so as not to offer the driver packages again. The 20190217 snapshot had just three packages updated. The keyboard management library libgnomekbd 3.26.1 fixed a build with new GLib and updated translations. VMcore extraction tool makedumpfile 1.6.5 added some patches, bug fixes and improved support for arm64 systems with Kernel Address Space Layout Randomization (KASLR). The jump in the release of yast2-storage-ng from 4.1.53 to 4.1.59 provided quite a few changes like allowing the partitioner to create block cache (bcache) devices without a caching set and the newest version limits bcache support to x86_64. Read more