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Software: No More Secrets, Discus, googler, Beast

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Software
  • No More Secrets – Recreate Famous Data Decryption Effect Seen On Sneakers Movie

    A while ago, we published a guide that described how to turn your Ubuntu Linux console into a veritable Hollywood technical melodrama hacker interface using Hollywood utility which is written by Dustin Kirkland from Canonical. Today, I have stumbled upon a similar CLI utility named “No More Secrets”, shortly nms. Like Hollywood utility, the nms utility is also USELESS (Sorry!). You can use it just for fun. The nms will recreate the famous data decryption effect seen on Sneakers, released in 1992.

    Sneakers is a comedy and crime-thriller genre movie, starred by Robert Redford among other famous actors named Dan Aykroyd, David Strathairn and Ben Kingsley. This movie is one of the popular hacker movie released in 1990s. If you haven’t watched it already, there is a scene in Sneakers movie where a group of experts who specialize in testing security systems will recover a top secret black box that has the ability to decrypt all existing encryption systems around the world. The nms utility simply simulates how exactly the data decryption effect scene looks like on Sneakers movie in your Terminal.

  • Discus – Show Colourised Disk Space Usage in Linux

    In our last article, we have explained how to use df (disk filesystem) utility to report file system disk space usage in Linux. We have discovered yet a another great utility for the same purpose but with a prettier output, called discus.

    Discus is a df-like, highly configurable utility for checking disk space utilization in Linux, intended to make df prettier with fancy features such as colored output, bar graphs, and smart formatting of numbers. To configure it, you may copy its main configuration file /etc/discusrc to ~/.discusrc and do your customization in there.

  • googler: Google Web and Google News from the command-line

    I love working with the command line. Seriously, I think there’s hardly anything more productive and versatile for a software developer than the terminal. Maybe it’s the hacker in me. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a heavy user of graphical applications, but the terminal will always have a special place.

    I’ve recently come across a command-line tool that’s right up my street. It’s called googler, an open source tool to Google from the command-line. It’s written in Python, so that ticks another box for me. googler isn’t affiliated to Google in any way.

  • Beast 0.12.0-beta.1

    It’s been a while since the last Beast release, mainly because we have a lot of code migrations going on, some of which caused severe regressions.

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Official TV HAT brings DVB-T2 streaming to the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has launched a Raspberry Pi TV HAT with a Sony CXD2880 TV tuner for receiving DVB-T2 transmissions in Europe. The $21.50 board debuts a half-size HAT format. The computer that was born to empower technology education in the UK can now be rejiggered into an old-fashioned idiot box. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has produced an official HAT add-on board for the Raspberry Pi with a Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) tuner that receives terrestrial TV signals. The $21.50 Raspberry Pi TV HAT lets you stream DTV-T2 and DTV-T video in the UK and Europe. Read more

today's howtos

A Bright Spotlight on elementary OS 5.0

It's really bright. elementary OS 5.0 is the best release so far by mainly it's AppCenter uniqueness and richest of desktop features ever among the prior releases. The thing I love the most is the fact that elementary OS developers contribute greatly to our community which we didn't see anything like that before: they created a new software distribution platform similar to what we previously saw on Apple macOS, except it's for free/libre open source software, by allowing app developers to get paid directly by the users (with the so-called "pay-what-you-want" system). elementary OS is popular, as you may see on Distrowatch, so we can expect bright future for the health of its apps market (and hope more developers getting attracted to join). The desktop is really usable, the shortcut keys are visible (by pressing Super key) and customizable, its enhanced with parental control as well as Night Light, the apps are plenty and still growing in numbers, plus it's compatible with Ubuntu 18.04 so you can install thousands of packages if you wish right now. I can run it really smooth on an Intel 967 CPU with 4GB RAM (Intel Graphics). I hope it will be smoother on your systems. I wish this quick review of mine helps you a lot to get attracted to elementary OS and soon be a happy user. Read more