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KDE: PIM Sprint 2018, Distributing Qt-based Software, Usability & Productivity

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KDE
  • KDE PIM Sprint 2018

    Attending the yearly KDE Pim Sprint in April in Toulouse was nice. For me it is often leaving a cold rainy Germany and arriving warm, almost summer weather with a lot of sun. This time the weather in Germany was also sunny and warm when I left, but spring's always further in Toulouse. As only around ten people attended the sprint, it was also a time to get to know the people behind the nicknames. Unfortunately there were no new faces this time, but a new contributor joined the Pim team and attended remotely.

    As the trains from Germany to Toulouse take some time, for me, the sprint normally starts with entering the train and having time to hack. The first things I looked at, were some cleanups in the dependency chain in KDE Pim, by moving stuff around.

    Reaching Toulouse, David and I started to dig into the problem, that sometimes connections to remote servers stall and nothing goes back and forth without an error being triggered. This issue is only visible if the internet connection is not stable, like a connection while riding the train. Yes, it's a good thing that sometime developers have to face real world, to be able to reproduce bugs. To solve these issues we first had to reproduce them, which leads into the problem of how to reproduce an unstable internet connection. It took a while before we had a setup running to reproduce the issue and after a lot of trial and error, we finally managed to fix the issues we'd found.

  • Distributing Qt application using Qt Installer framework

    Qt installer framework is a collection of tools that can be used to make installers on Linux, Windows and Mac . You can either use pre-built versions or compile it from source.

    There are other softwares like NSIS, installBuilder that can be used to make installers but I wanted an open source & cross platform tool therefore I chose Qt installer framework and it’s also fun to try out new things.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 30

    Akademy is next week (I will be there!), but that didn’t stop us from plugging away on the Usability and Productivity initiative!

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