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Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, Lubuntu 16.04.5, and UBports' Ubuntu Touch on 16.04.x

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released on Heels of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Bundles All Past Stable Release Updates

    A few days ago we covered the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and also the NCSC’s guidelines on Ubuntu 18.04 security, but there’s more news yet from the Ubuntu team – they just released Ubuntu 16.04.5 Xenial Xerus LTS (Long Term Support) for folks who will not upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    This latest update to Ubuntu 16.04 has a new hardware enablement stack intended to work with the latest hardware out-of-the-box. Support for this is offered on all architectures except 32-bit powerpc, and it is installed by default when using the desktop images as an installation media. Ubuntu Server will default to installing the GA kernel, but users can optionally choose to install the HWE kernel instead.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released, Available to Download Now

    Download Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, the fifth (and final) point release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It features Linux kernel 4.15, Xorg updates, and various bug fixes.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

    Like previous LTS series’, 16.04.5 includes hardware enablement stacks for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures except for 32-bit powerpc, and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images. Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel, however you may select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

    As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

  • Lubuntu 16.04.5 has been released!

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, we are pleased to announce that Lubuntu 16.04.5 LTS has been released!

  • UBports' Ubuntu Touch Unlikely To Move To Ubuntu 18.04 Anytime Soon

    Given that it was only earlier this summer when UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 upgraded to an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS base, you might be wondering when they intend to transition to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS... But don't hold your breath.

    During the latest Ubuntu Touch Q&A, the matter came up of if/when they will transition from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04 as the newest Long Term Support release. But long story short is they have no immediate plans to do so.

    The resources of the community-driven UBports is limited as is and the migration to Ubuntu 18.04 would require systemd, among other changes, as well as 18.04 using newer versions of Mir, Unity 8, and libhybris that would conflict with the current UBports work.

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