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Proprietary: ​Opera as Snap on GNU/Linux, Chrome 69 Beta

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Ubuntu
  • Opera launches as a Snap for Linux users

    Opera and Canonical today announce that Opera, the popular web browser, is now available as a Snap in the Snap Store. Opera is the latest notable addition to the Snap Store providing ever more choice to Linux users via an easy to install, always up to date application direct from the software vendor.

    Opera, founded in 1995 in Oslo has been delivering browsers and AI-driven content delivery products to 322 million users worldwide across a range of devices and operating systems. It is responsible for now standardised browser features such as tabs or speed dial. Currently, it is the browser of choice for more demanding users who seek features such as a built-in VPN, ad blocker or a separate messengers sidebar.

  • ​Opera is available in a Snap on Linux

    They've done this by packing Opera into a Snap in the Snap Store. The Opera snap is supported on Debian, Elementary, Fedora, Linux Mint, Manjaro, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, and other Linux distributions.

    Snaps are containerised software packages. They're designed to work securely within any Linux environment across desktop, the cloud, and IoT devices. Thousands of snaps have been launched since 2016. Users like them because they come with automatic updates and roll-back features.

    Snaps also are a bit more secure than most Linux apps. They make it easier for developers to roll out their programs. When your program in encased in a Snap, you don't need to worry about the distribution's native packaging or whether the desktop distro includes a vital library your application needs.

  • Opera Web Browser Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

    Canonical and Opera Software informs Softpedia today about the availability of the Chromium-based Opera web browser as a Snap package in the Snap Store for Ubuntu and supported Linux-based operating systems.

    Used by more than 322 million users worldwide on a wide range of devices and computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, Opera is a very popular web browser based on the latest technologies from the open-source Chromium project. On Linux platforms, users can install Opera as DEB and RPM packages.

  • Opera Browser is Now Available in the Ubuntu Snap Store

    It just got a whole lot easier to install the Opera web browser on Ubuntu and other Linux distros. Canonical has announced that the well-known web browser is now available as a Snap app in the Ubuntu Snap store.

  • Chrome 69 Beta: CSS tricks, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 69 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 69 is beta as of August 2.

  • Chrome 69 Beta Released With AV1 Decode & Various CSS Additions

    Google has rolled out the Chrome 69 beta web-browser update today for Linux, Android, and other supported platforms.

    Chrome 69 Beta is quite exciting in that it introduces initial support for AV1 video decoding support -- albeit still in very early form but now possible thanks to AV1 v1.0 being firmed up. There are also a number of CSS styling enhancements with Chrome 69 Beta including support for conic gradients, new margin/padding/border properties, scroll snap positions, display cutouts, and more.

More on Opera

Google Chrome 69 Enters Beta with Notch Support

  • Google Chrome 69 Enters Beta with Notch Support, Adopts the AV1 Video Decoder

    Google promoted today the Chrome 69 web browser from the Developer channel to the Beta one for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, giving us a first look at the new features and improvements.

    One of the coolest new features that will be available on the Google Chrome 69 release when it launches next month its support for the next-generation and efficient AV1 video codec developed by the Alliance for Open Media. AV1 promises to fix the current video streaming issues supported by most users by improving the compression efficiency with up to 30% compared to existing codecs.

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Server: HTTP Clients, IIS DDoS and 'DevOps' Hype From Red Hat

  • What are good command line HTTP clients?
    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a “software tools” movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well independently. This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files over the internet from the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications. Working with HTTP from the command-line is a worthwhile skill for HTTP architects and API designers. If you need to play around with an API, HTTPie and curl will be invaluable.
  • Microsoft publishes security alert on IIS bug that causes 100% CPU usage spikes
    The Microsoft Security Response Center published yesterday a security advisory about a denial of service (DOS) issue impacting IIS (Internet Information Services), Microsoft's web server technology.
  • 5 things to master to be a DevOps engineer
    There's an increasing global demand for DevOps professionals, IT pros who are skilled in software development and operations. In fact, the Linux Foundation's Open Source Jobs Report ranked DevOps as the most in-demand skill, and DevOps career opportunities are thriving worldwide. The main focus of DevOps is bridging the gap between development and operations teams by reducing painful handoffs and increasing collaboration. This is not accomplished by making developers work on operations tasks nor by making system administrators work on development tasks. Instead, both of these roles are replaced by a single role, DevOps, that works on tasks within a cooperative team. As Dave Zwieback wrote in DevOps Hiring, "organizations that have embraced DevOps need people who would naturally resist organization silos."

Purism's Privacy and Security-Focused Librem 5 Linux Phone to Arrive in Q3 2019

Initially planned to ship in early 2019, the revolutionary Librem 5 mobile phone was delayed for April 2019, but now it suffered just one more delay due to the CPU choices the development team had to make to deliver a stable and reliable device that won't heat up or discharge too quickly. Purism had to choose between the i.MX8M Quad or the i.MX8M Mini processors for their Librem 5 Linux-powered smartphone, but after many trials and errors they decided to go with the i.MX8M Quad CPU as manufacturer NXP recently released a new software stack solving all previous power consumption and heating issues. Read more

Qt Creator 4.9 Beta released

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.9 Beta! There are many improvements and fixes included in Qt Creator 4.9. I’ll just mention some highlights in this blog post. Please refer to our change log for a more thorough overview. Read more

Hack Week - Browsersync integration for Online

Recently my LibreOffice work is mostly focused on the Online. It's nice to see how it is growing with new features and has better UI. But when I was working on improving toolbars (eg. folding menubar or reorganization of items) I noticed one annoying thing from the developer perspective. After every small change, I had to restart the server to provide updated content for the browser. It takes few seconds for switching windows, killing old server then running new one which requires some tests to be passed. Last week during the Hack Week funded by Collabora Productivity I was able to work on my own projects. It was a good opportunity for me to try to improve the process mentioned above. I've heard previously about browsersync so I decided to try it out. It is a tool which can automatically reload used .css and .js files in all browser sessions after change detection. To make it work browsersync can start proxy server watching files on the original server and sending events to the browser clients if needed. Read more