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GNU/Linux Miscellany

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  • Dell's XPS 13 Developer Edition now ships with Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS

    LINUX FANS CAN WE GET A 'HUZZAH'? because Dell has finally pulled up its trousers and released a Developer Edition of the 2018 XPS 13.

    The 9379 model, in case you're asking, will arrive running Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS, the latest version of the non-Windows 10 operating system. For developers and people who worship at the church of Torvalds, that should be a boon as previous Developer Editions of the XPS 13 have come with the outdated Ubuntu 16.04.

    And if you can't shell out for a Developer Edition XPS 13 this time around, which will set you back something in the area of £1,300 for a decently-specced model, Dell has plans to keep knocking out XPS machines with Ubuntu.

  • Linux apps will now run better on low-memory Chromebooks

    Earlier this year, Linux apps on Chrome launched on the Pixelbook, a speedy Chromebook with 8GB RAM. Since then, dozens of devices have received support from low-end to high-end, and even ARM Chromebooks too. A recent Chromium commit introduces better resource management for Linux apps on Chrome OS by dynamically managing RAM – great news for low-memory Chromebooks.

  • Microsoft boosts Office 2019 price by 10% [Ed: With proprietary software and so-called 'cloud' you're not in control of your finances, let alone your data, your PC etc.]

    Microsoft plans to raise the price of its perpetually-licensed Office suite by 10% in October.

  • Mageia Roundup 2018 – Weeks 28-30, an Anniversary, RMLL and more

    Astonishing numbers of people in the northern hemisphere have been vacationing, harvesting, fighting fires – but there’s still a heap of work happening. Thanks, Mageians!

    Mageia 6.1 is getting closer all the time, and in the meantime, some of you might have noticed that the Mageia 5->6 update is now available through the systray icon – it’s been enabled once more. To have it work, you need to re-enable “check for new releases” in the Updates Frequency settings in Mageia Control Centre. You’ll also see a different version of the tray icon – instead of the blue circle with the down arrow, you’ll see the orange circle with a round arrow. This is to let you know that Mageia 5 is now officially out of date.

    Some info from the QA team: if you’re upgrading from KDE4 to Plasma, there could be some issues with older video cards. If you’re not sure, make certain before you update that you have another, non-KDE desktop environment installed – XFce is usually problem-free. Log in to that non-KDE environment before you begin the update.

    As with all larger updates, if you’re using a laptop, connect to AC power and make sure you have plenty of disk space available and a reliable internet connection.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (May and June 2018)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Andre Bianchi
    Simon Quigley
    Andrius Merkys
    Tong Sun
    James Lu
    Raphaël Halimi
    Paul Seyfert
    Dustin Kirkland
    Yanhao Mo
    Paride Legovini

  • UK Government Publishes List of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Security Tips

    The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (part of GCHQ) has issued a new report full of advice on how to improve the security of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    The NCSC is a (relatively new) section of the UK government responsible for issuing security advice to the public, businesses and private sector stakeholders on how to avoid computer security threats.

    It’s also responsible for co-ordinating a response to any major online security incidents or breaches.

  • Ubuntu Linux-based Lubuntu no longer focusing on old hardware after move to LXQt

    Ubuntu is a great Linux distribution, but understandably, the GNOME desktop environment isn't for everyone. Thankfully, there are many flavors of the operating system with alternative DEs, such as Xubuntu with XFCe and Kubuntu with KDE. Ultimately, with so much choice, you should have no problem finding a version of Ubuntu that best meets your needs and wants.

    One popular Ubuntu flavor is Lubuntu. If you aren't familiar, it uses the lightweight LXDE desktop environment which makes it a good choice for older hardware. In fact, one of the focuses of the Lubuntu developers is to support aging computers. When Lubunu 18.10 is released in October 2018, it will ditch LXDE for the newer LXQt. Despite it also being a desktop environment that is easy on resources, the Lubuntu developers are planning to drop their focus on old hardware after the transition.

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  • This Could Be Google Pixel 3 XL “Clearly White” — Leaks Suggest
  • Fortnite For Android Will Launch On These 40 Android Smartphones
  • 6 Best Android Gestures Apps To Get iPhone X Gestures In 2018

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Enable Timestamp For History Command In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Whenever a command is entered in the terminal, it will be saved at the end of the history file in Linux. You can easily retrieve these commands at any time using history command. The shell is also tracking the timestamp of all command entries, so that we can easily find when a specific command is executed. We already have shown you how to enable timestamp in Bash and Zsh shells. Today we will see how to enable timestamp for history command in Fish shell in Linux. In addition, we will also learn how to create a simple function to show the date and time stamps in history command output in fish shell.

  • Linux: How To Encrypt And Decrypt Files With A Password
  • How to convert pdf to image on Linux command line - nixCraft

    I have many PDF files, and I need to convert them to a png file format, add a border to those images, and convert back all those images to pdf format. How can I convert pdf to image format on Linux and vice versa using the CLI?

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Restrict WordPress Site Access - Anto Online

    A lot of the time, you need to restrict access to various users on your website. Whether you’re cordoning premium content, sensitive pages, or content targeted to specific individuals, there are various ways you can restrict user access easily and effectively on your WordPress website. The easiest method is using plugins that you can just download and link with your website. If you have coding skills, you can also edit various functions to achieve the same thing. We shall also take a look at how you can restrict site managers with various levels of access. Whatever kind of site restrictions you need to accomplish, stick with us and we will help you do it.

Linux Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman's Talk and Panics

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: Lessons for Developers from 20 Years of Linux Kernel Work [Ed: "The Linux Foundation is a sponsor of The New Stack" for the latter to write puff pieces such as these, so it's basically marketing]
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: 'Don't Make Users Mad'

    Kroah-Hartman explains that one of Linus Torvalds' most deeply-held convictions: don't break userspace. "Other operating systems have this rule as well — it's a very solid rule — because we always want you to upgrade. And we want you to upgrade without worrying about it. We don't want you to feel scared. If you see a new release, and we say, 'Hey, this fixes a bunch of problems,' we don't want you to feel worried about taking that. That's really really important — especially with security...." If you do make a change, make sure there truly is a compelling reason. "You have to provide enough reason and enough goodness to force somebody to take the time to learn to do something else. That's very rare." His example of this was systemd, which unified a variety of service configurations and initialization processes. "They did it right. They provided all the functionality, they solved a real problem that was there. They unified all these existing tools and problems in such a way that it was just so much better to use, and it provided enough impetus that everybody was willing to do the work to modify their own stuff and move to the new model. It worked. People still complain about it, but it worked. Everybody switched... It works well. It solves a real problem. "That was an example of how you can provide a compelling reason to move on — and make the change."

  • What to do in case of a Linux kernel panic

    Linux is used everywhere in the IT world. You've probably used Linux today, even if you didn't realize it. If you have learned anything about Linux, then you know it is indeed a kernel. The kernel is the primary unit of the Linux operating system (OS) and is responsible for communications between a computer's hardware and its processes. In this article, you will learn about one situation related to the Linux kernel: The kernel panic. The term itself can make you panic, but if you have the proper knowledge, then you can remain calm. Every system admin faces this issue at least once in their career, but reinstalling the system is not the first solution you should turn to. [...] Now, anytime you see a kernel panic error, you will definitely not panic because you know why this error occurred and how to resolve it. This article covers one of the common Linux boot problems: kernel panic. There are so many other potential boot problems that can occur in Linux, but resolving those issues will become much less of a panic when you gain some advanced knowledge of your system.

Audiocasts/Shows: Apple Hype From the Viewpoint of GNU/Linux

  • The M1 Macbook Pro (From a Linux users perspective) - YouTube

    I have the new Macbook Pro with the M1 CPU in the studio, and I decided to make a video to give you guys my thoughts on it. This is not a super-detailed review, as Mac isn't my platform of choice. Since my primary OS is Linux, I thought it might make for an interesting video.

  • Will Apple's move to ARM lead to Linux Desktop DOMINANCE?
  • Linus Torvalds on Apple M1 Mac, Blender, PulseAudio, 25 Years of GIMP | This Week in Linux 127 - TuxDigital

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of Audio related news this week. We’ve got a new release from the Digital Audio Workstation, Ardour. A new release of PulseAudio, AV Linux, and we’ve got some interesting news from Fedora about potentially switching to PipeWire. In App News this week, we’ll check out the latest release of Blender and celebrate 25 Years of GIMP. Linus Torvalds commented on using Linux on Apple’s new M1 Mac and we’ll round the show out with a new product from Pine64, a soldering iron, and there has been a distro merge between Sabayon and Funtoo. All that and much more coming up right now on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

IBM/Red Hat: DevNation, Education and Matrix for Fedora

  • Cloud-native modernization or death? A false dichotomy - Red Hat Developer

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about cloud-native modernization from Daniel Oh and Burr Sutter. Are you familiar with the tight coupling of applications with their underlying platform that makes change hard? Or, coupling that creates a lack of scalability, performance, and flexibility for existing applications built with legacy technology? How about the fact that re-architecting applications cannot be done overnight? If you say yes to any of these, you probably think that you have “cloud-native modernization or death.” But what if there is another way that shows you the incremental steps to refactor the application to microservices and make use of Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift to effectively deploy and manage it at scale on the cloud?

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  • Red Hat : Emerging Trends of Using Open Source Software in Education

    Traditionally, software has been classified into application system software and operating systems software. Application software facilitate users' work in executing routine processes while operating systems software is designed to make all the different hardware components, as well as all the peripherals, work together and operate as an integrated machine. Examples of modern operating systems software are various flavors of Microsoft Windows, and Red Hat Linux. The Microsoft Office Suite (with MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Access, and MS Publisher) are good examples of application software. Fact is, for almost every thinkable task under the sun, there exist an application software that can execute the task. Most software are proprietary and owned by somebody. To use it, one has to purchase it from the developer or a distribution point. Also, a user cannot modify the software code if it is proprietary. Software that fall in this category is classified as closed. A good example is Microsoft's products.

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  • Kevin Fenzi: Matrix and Fedora

    Recently the Fedora Council has been floating the idea of modernizing the Fedora community real-time chat platform (currently IRC hosted at freenode.net). The front runner is matrix. I last looked at matrix 4 or so years ago, so I thought it would be a good time to revisit it and see how it looks today. TLDR: I suspect we will have IRC and Matrix bridged together for a long time to come, if you are new user, use Matrix, if not keep using IRC. First a few words about IRC (Internet Relay Chat). IRC is a 30+ year old chat protocol. There’s tons of clients. There’s tons of bots and add-ons. There’s tons of gateways and aggregators. So, whats not to like? Well, everything is a add-on mish mash that can be very confusing and frustrating for new users. For example, IRC has no persistance, you only see messages while your client is connected. So, folks invented irc “bouncers” to connect for you to the IRC networks you care about and when you reconnect play back all the messages you missed. Authentication is via messaging various services bots. Encryption is via plugins or other add ons (and often not setup). So, most old timers have a client they have carefully tuned, a bouncer and a bunch of custom bots, which is fine, but new users (not surprisingly) find this all a hassle and frustrating. IRC also has it’s own culture and rituals, some of which still make sense to me, but others that don’t. Matrix on the other hand is pretty new (6 years). You can interact with it as a guest or have an account on a particular homeserver. If you have an account all your history is saved, and can be synced to your client on login. You can send pictures and moves and fancy gifs. You can (somewhat) have end to end encryption (see clients below) with encrypted rooms where the server can’t know what was said in the room. You can have ‘reactions’ to things people say. You can redact something you said in the past. You can have a nice avatar and a Real Name (if you like). You can join rooms/conversations with other matrix servers (for example the kde, mozilla and others are running servers). You can get read receipts to see who read your message and notifications when someone is typing (also client dependent see below). [...] The real question is how long should we keep the current situation with Matrix and IRC bridged? What advantages would be dropping the irc bridges bring? Right now, not too much. End to end encryption isn’t that interesting for an open source project. Reactions are interesting (think about using them to vote up or down proposals in meetings?), but we have done without them so far. I think migration from IRC is going to be a long process, nor is there great advantage to pushing things to go faster. I hope that over coming years matrix clients continue to get better and implement more features. Someday (probably years down the road) more Fedora users will be on Matrix than IRC, then sometime after that things will have shifted enough that the community will start assuming you are on Matrix.