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Why C has no place in Computer Science research

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Software

I came across this post, which highlights top 5 reasons why a developer should unlearn C. Given the past experience I had with realities of C development I mostly concur with the author.

In the last months I was deeply involved with building a resource broker component for the Grid Operating System project I am involved with. The biggest mistake I made initially was to go along with a C webservices framework, Apache Axis2/C thinking that in an OS level project most of the stuff should be in C due to speed and optimization reasons. This was a decision which cost us months! The original broker itself was developed pretty quickly, perhaps in 2 weeks, and we deveployed it in machines took results everything went fine. Now, when I upgraded the systems to Slackware 11.0, and then ran the broker, nothing will work! It will always segfault as soon as the service was started, I tried 20+ hrs session of debugging fixing the problem but to no avail. I traced the problem to the the framework in which it was built, Axis2/C and contacted a developer to seek some help, but the reply was that the framework was not stable for some platforms now and it will take some months for a stable version to be released. The latest release is Axis2/C 0.95.

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