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Nintendo Wii: the Ars Technica review

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Gaming

With the Xbox 360 and the PS3, the primary focus is graphical prowess. What special effects can be added to games; how high can we push the resolution, and just how good we can make these titles look? It can be argued that with most games on these two systems, the primary difference between the next-gen and last-gen is improved graphics. Fight Night Round 3 looks better on the PS3 than on the PS2, for instance, but is it worth $10 more? In many cases these new games feel a lot like old games with a new coat of paint. One might begin to wonder if we are going to see the same basic gaming concepts over and over, simply with better graphics as time goes on?

Nintendo is saying no; they are dropping out of the graphics race. Fact is, the Wii is not very powerful in relation to its two competitors. Where it can fight back is innovation; instead of a normal controller, you interact with the game via a remote control-like device that many simply call the "Wiimote." In-game movements are based on, well, real-life movement—and one or two buttons. This control scheme is designed to be intuitive and to really immerse you in what you're doing.

That's the basic proposition: last-gen graphics with a truly new and innovative control scheme. Are gamers going to be willing to overlook the dated graphics in exchange for waving their hands around instead of tapping buttons?

Full Story.

Nintendo says 600,000 Wiis sold in eight days

Nintendo Co. Ltd. sold 600,000 units of its new Wii video game console in the first eight days after its release in the Americas, as the company vies with rivals Sony Corp. and Microsoft Corp. for gamers' hearts and wallets.

Including sales of accessories and games, Nintendo's Wii-related revenue had hit $190 million since the machine's November 19 release, the company said.

At $250, the Wii costs half as much as the cheapest version of Sony's PlayStation 3 console, which went on sale in the United States two days before the Wii hit the market.

Full Story.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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