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Software: Continuous Integration, Curl, Browsh and Statcode

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Software
  • Continuous integration and delivery tool basics

    The CircleCI tool is admired for its speed. That's because CircleCI caches builds and can run tests in parallel over multiple machines. The net result is quick test times. It’s also appreciated because it can be run in the cloud or as an on-premises version.

    You can use CircleCI on almost any operating system or cloud. CircleCI is a single-page web application that makes heavy use of AJAX and HTML5. What you can't do with it is build Windows applications. While you can build applications using .NET Core under Docker with CircleCI, that's far from full Windows building or test support.

  • curl 7.61.0

    Yet again we say hello to a new curl release that has been uploaded to the servers and sent off into the world. Version 7.61.0 (full changelog). It has been exactly eight weeks since 7.60.0 shipped.

  • Browsh is the Text-based Web Browser You’ve Been Dreaming Of

    I woke up today to find my Twitter feed chok full of praise for something called Browsh.

    It’s a brand new, modern text-based web browser built for the command line.

    Yes, I did just say a text browser.

    And yes, the year is still 2018.

    So what’s got the geeks I follow gushing over something so terrifically niche?

  • Statcode – Get A Quick Explanation Of Various HTTP Status Codes

    If you’re a web developer, I’ve got a good news for you today. You can now stop spending time on Internet to look for what a particular response code mean. Say hello to Statcode. It is like man pages, but only for HTTP status codes. You can easily get the quick explanation of a http code within minutes, without leaving your Terminal. As you may know already, Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) response status codes are issued by a server in response to a client’s request made to the server. Statcode is written using Python programming language and works on GNU/Linux, Mac OS and Windows.

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