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OSS Leftovers

  • Why you really don't want just one vendor running an open source project

    When someone calls out Linux and Hadoop as two multi-vendor open source communities that have "made commercialization of the technology extremely competitive and difficult," it would be reasonable to wonder what planet they live on. After all, as MongoDB's Henrik Ingo challenged, "Surely those are the two biggest and most successful ecosystems???"

    Joseph Jacks, who made the first statement, is active with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. He's not a newbie to open source. In arguing for single-vendor open source "communities" and their allegedly superior economics, he has perhaps unwittingly argued for (one) winner-takes-all when far more money is available in (many) winners-take-much markets.

    But first, here's what we're not talking about.

  • Privacy-Centric ‘Bob Wallet’ Adds Bitcoin Cash Support

    Privacy is important in the cryptocurrency ecosystem to a large number of individuals, and people believe private transactions are needed badly these days in a society watched by the ‘deep state.’ Because people find privacy to be extremely important, some developers have designed bitcoin mixers and tumblers that help obfuscate cryptocurrency transactions recorded on public blockchains. One specific project in the works called Bob Wallet offers a privacy-centric client that enables users to move BTC and BCH from a public wallet to a private wallet in a secretive fashion.

  • Private & Public Open Source Bob Wallet Adds Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Crypto Support

    Privacy-centric Bob Wallet recently added Bitcoin Cash (BCH) support so BCH users can use BCH Testnet coins and experiment with the mixing service. The Wallet was created to help preserve Bitcoins fungibility. Today it is easy to trace bitcoin transactions from address to address by simply using any public Block Explorer. Bob Wallet helps fix this.

    The open source project doesn’t allow you to make payments to others as its only purpose is to allow the movement of funds from your public wallet to a private wallet in an isolated manner. The project, which is currently in Beta should only be used in Testnet for now until the software is thoroughly tested. Users can visit the Bob Wallet website or drag and drop the ‘bobwallet.html’ into a browser to create a new Bob Wallet.

  • Rainmeter 4.2 Build 3111 [Ed: GPL, but Windows only]

    Rainmeter is a free, open-source platform that enables skins to run on the desktop. Rainmeter allows you to display customizable skins on your desktop, from hardware usage meters to fully functional audio visualizers. You are only limited by your imagination and creativity.

    Rainmeter is the best known and most popular desktop customization program for Windows. Enhance your Windows computer at home or work with skins; handy, compact applets that float freely on your desktop. Rainmeter skins provide you with useful information at a glance. It's easy to keep an eye on your system resources, like memory and battery power, or your online data streams, including email, RSS feeds, and weather forecasts.

  • Oasis Labs to Create Blockchain-Based Privacy-First Cloud Computing Platform, Elisa Music Player Version 0.2 Released, Unitary Fund Awarding Grants to Projects Developing Open-Source Quantum Software and More

    The Unitary Fund, which was created with "personal donations from founder of security firm Lookout, John Hering, and developer of quantum integrated circuits Rigetti Computing product manager Nima Alidoust", recently launched. The fund is offering $2000 grants to projects developing open-source quantum software. According to ComputerWorld, "Any project that 'will benefit humanity that leverages near-term quantum computing' qualifies to apply for the fund.

  • Quantum computing fund set up for open-source projects

    A new program to support the development of open source projects in quantum computing has been launched. The Unitary Fund will offer six grants of $2,000 to fund open source quantum computing projects.

    The fund was created by William Zeng, head of quantum cloud services for the quantum computing company Rigetti. According to Zeng, in order for quantum computing hardware and platforms to advance, they need smart software

  • GCC's Conversion To Git Is Being Held Up By RAM, a.k.a. Crazy DDR4 Prices

    After converting the GNU Emacs repository to Git a few years back, Eric S Raymond has been working on the massive undertaking of transferring the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) repository in full over to Git. But the transition to GCC Git is being hampered since due to the massive size of the repository, Raymond's system is running under extreme memory pressure with 64GB of RAM.

    ESR provided an update on the GCC repository conversion process. He has managed to solve the only known remaining technical bug that's been blocking the repository, but now he can't get the process completed since he's over-running memory capacity. His primary workstation has 64GB of DDR4 memory and that's turned out to not be enough for the GNU Compiler Collection repository with more than a quarter million commits over the past three decades.

  • Why DOD Should Look Before Leaping into Open Source

    In February 2018, the Department of Defense (DOD) Defense Digital Service (DDS) relaunched Code.mil to expand the use of open source code. In short, Code.mil aims to enable the migration of some of the department’s custom-developed code into a central repository for other agency developers to reduce work redundancy and save costs in software development. This move to open source makes sense considering that much of the innovation and technological advancements we are seeing are happening in the open source space.

    Since its launch, Code.mil has, according to the DDS, helped spur many open source-enabled projects, including the creation of eMCM last March—an easily accessible web-based version of the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM) that outlines the official conduct guide to the courts-martial in the U.S. military. Before the digital relaunch of MCM, the process for updating the Manual for Courts-Martial was tedious and involved approvals from a handful of government offices, resulting in delayed and outdated releases of guidance that occurred only once every several years. In its open version, the MCM is periodically updated allowing for a live version to be widely accessible across the U.S. military.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor

  • NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor
    NVMM provides hardware-accelerated virtualization support for NetBSD. It is made of an ~MI frontend, to which MD backends can be plugged. A virtualization API is shipped via libnvmm, that allows to easily create and manage virtual machines via NVMM. Two additional components are shipped as demonstrators, toyvirt and smallkern: the former is a toy virtualizer, that executes in a VM the 64bit ELF binary given as argument, the latter is an example of such binary.
  • NetBSD Gains Hardware Accelerated Virtualization
    NetBSD, the highly portable Unix-like Open Source operating system known for its platform diversity, has gained hardware-accelerated virtualization support via an improved NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM).

GNU Releases: mailutils, cflow, tar and parallel

Devices: AArch64, Siemens/Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL), Raspberry Pi and Xiaomi

  • We need Arm64 systems for developers. Again.
    Getting AArch64 hardware for developers is important. When it happen? One day. Maybe even before people forget that such architecture existed. We talk about it during each Linaro Connect. So far nothing serious came from it. We had some failed attempts like Cello or Husky. There is Synquacer with own set of issues. Some people use MACCHIATObin. Some still use Applied Micro Mustangs which should get a place in computer museums. It is chicken and egg issue. No one makes affordable AArch64 systems because no one buys them. Because no one makes them. Hardware vendors concentrate on server market — no chips to choose for developer systems.
  • Siemens PLM Software announces enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution
    Siemens PLM Software announced an enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides an operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, an enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Siemens launches new enterprise class embedded Linux solution for embedded systems development
    With the growth of internet of things (IoT) and other smart devices, it is becoming increasingly complex and expensive for manufacturers to develop embedded distributions and applications for these devices based on the Linux® operating system. Siemens PLM Software today announced a new enterprise Mentor® Embedded Linux® (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This new MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides a robust operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, a broadly utilized, enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    The Raspberry Pi folks have been working the past few months on upgrading their kernel in moving from Linux 4.14 to 4.19. That roll-out has now begun. Linux 4.19 has been the target of the Raspberry Pi Foundation due to this newer kernel being a Long-Term Support (LTS) release and thus will be maintained for the long-term. That large jump in the standard kernel version for Raspberry Pi ultimately means less work too for the developers involved: between 4.14 and 4,19, a lot of Raspberry Pi patches and other Broadcom improvements were upstreamed.
  • Raspberry Pi Updates Devices to Linux 4.19
  • Xiaomi’s 2019 goal is to release kernel source code more quickly for all its devices
    Just before MWC 2019, Xiaomi took to the stage at an event in China to launch the new Xiaomi Mi 9 and Mi 9 SE. Both the devices represent the best of what OEM has to offer, bringing in a high value device at a fraction of the cost of a premium flagship. While this approach lets them appeal to the average consumer, Xiaomi has also been quite developer-friendly, which makes them a good purchase even for those who are looking for a device with a very good third party development community. Xiaomi does not void the warranty of devices (in India at least) if you unlock the bootloader, and they have worked on significantly bringing down the waiting times for bootloader unlock requests too.