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OSS Leftovers

  • Why you really don't want just one vendor running an open source project

    When someone calls out Linux and Hadoop as two multi-vendor open source communities that have "made commercialization of the technology extremely competitive and difficult," it would be reasonable to wonder what planet they live on. After all, as MongoDB's Henrik Ingo challenged, "Surely those are the two biggest and most successful ecosystems???"

    Joseph Jacks, who made the first statement, is active with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. He's not a newbie to open source. In arguing for single-vendor open source "communities" and their allegedly superior economics, he has perhaps unwittingly argued for (one) winner-takes-all when far more money is available in (many) winners-take-much markets.

    But first, here's what we're not talking about.

  • Privacy-Centric ‘Bob Wallet’ Adds Bitcoin Cash Support

    Privacy is important in the cryptocurrency ecosystem to a large number of individuals, and people believe private transactions are needed badly these days in a society watched by the ‘deep state.’ Because people find privacy to be extremely important, some developers have designed bitcoin mixers and tumblers that help obfuscate cryptocurrency transactions recorded on public blockchains. One specific project in the works called Bob Wallet offers a privacy-centric client that enables users to move BTC and BCH from a public wallet to a private wallet in a secretive fashion.

  • Private & Public Open Source Bob Wallet Adds Bitcoin Cash (BCH) Crypto Support

    Privacy-centric Bob Wallet recently added Bitcoin Cash (BCH) support so BCH users can use BCH Testnet coins and experiment with the mixing service. The Wallet was created to help preserve Bitcoins fungibility. Today it is easy to trace bitcoin transactions from address to address by simply using any public Block Explorer. Bob Wallet helps fix this.

    The open source project doesn’t allow you to make payments to others as its only purpose is to allow the movement of funds from your public wallet to a private wallet in an isolated manner. The project, which is currently in Beta should only be used in Testnet for now until the software is thoroughly tested. Users can visit the Bob Wallet website or drag and drop the ‘bobwallet.html’ into a browser to create a new Bob Wallet.

  • Rainmeter 4.2 Build 3111 [Ed: GPL, but Windows only]

    Rainmeter is a free, open-source platform that enables skins to run on the desktop. Rainmeter allows you to display customizable skins on your desktop, from hardware usage meters to fully functional audio visualizers. You are only limited by your imagination and creativity.

    Rainmeter is the best known and most popular desktop customization program for Windows. Enhance your Windows computer at home or work with skins; handy, compact applets that float freely on your desktop. Rainmeter skins provide you with useful information at a glance. It's easy to keep an eye on your system resources, like memory and battery power, or your online data streams, including email, RSS feeds, and weather forecasts.

  • Oasis Labs to Create Blockchain-Based Privacy-First Cloud Computing Platform, Elisa Music Player Version 0.2 Released, Unitary Fund Awarding Grants to Projects Developing Open-Source Quantum Software and More

    The Unitary Fund, which was created with "personal donations from founder of security firm Lookout, John Hering, and developer of quantum integrated circuits Rigetti Computing product manager Nima Alidoust", recently launched. The fund is offering $2000 grants to projects developing open-source quantum software. According to ComputerWorld, "Any project that 'will benefit humanity that leverages near-term quantum computing' qualifies to apply for the fund.

  • Quantum computing fund set up for open-source projects

    A new program to support the development of open source projects in quantum computing has been launched. The Unitary Fund will offer six grants of $2,000 to fund open source quantum computing projects.

    The fund was created by William Zeng, head of quantum cloud services for the quantum computing company Rigetti. According to Zeng, in order for quantum computing hardware and platforms to advance, they need smart software

  • GCC's Conversion To Git Is Being Held Up By RAM, a.k.a. Crazy DDR4 Prices

    After converting the GNU Emacs repository to Git a few years back, Eric S Raymond has been working on the massive undertaking of transferring the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) repository in full over to Git. But the transition to GCC Git is being hampered since due to the massive size of the repository, Raymond's system is running under extreme memory pressure with 64GB of RAM.

    ESR provided an update on the GCC repository conversion process. He has managed to solve the only known remaining technical bug that's been blocking the repository, but now he can't get the process completed since he's over-running memory capacity. His primary workstation has 64GB of DDR4 memory and that's turned out to not be enough for the GNU Compiler Collection repository with more than a quarter million commits over the past three decades.

  • Why DOD Should Look Before Leaping into Open Source

    In February 2018, the Department of Defense (DOD) Defense Digital Service (DDS) relaunched Code.mil to expand the use of open source code. In short, Code.mil aims to enable the migration of some of the department’s custom-developed code into a central repository for other agency developers to reduce work redundancy and save costs in software development. This move to open source makes sense considering that much of the innovation and technological advancements we are seeing are happening in the open source space.

    Since its launch, Code.mil has, according to the DDS, helped spur many open source-enabled projects, including the creation of eMCM last March—an easily accessible web-based version of the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM) that outlines the official conduct guide to the courts-martial in the U.S. military. Before the digital relaunch of MCM, the process for updating the Manual for Courts-Martial was tedious and involved approvals from a handful of government offices, resulting in delayed and outdated releases of guidance that occurred only once every several years. In its open version, the MCM is periodically updated allowing for a live version to be widely accessible across the U.S. military.

More in Tux Machines

Results: Linux Foundation Technical Board Election 2018

The results of the 2018 election for members of the Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board have been posted; the members elected this time around are Chris Mason, Laura Abbott, Olof Johansson, Dan Williams, and Kees Cook. Abbott and Cook are new members to the board this time around. (The other TAB members are Ted Ts'o, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Jonathan Corbet, Tim Bird, and Steve Rostedt). Read more

10 Linux Commands For Network Diagnostics

It is difficult to find a Linux computer that is not connected to the network, be it server or workstation. From time to time it becomes necessary to diagnose faults, intermittence or slowness in the network. In this article, we will review some of the Linux commands most used for network diagnostics. Read
more

Variscite unveils its first i.MX8X module

Variscite’s “VAR-SOM-MX8X” COM runs Linux or Android on NXP’s up to quad -A35 core i.MX8X SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi/BT, dual GbE controllers, and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite has launched its first i.MX8X-based computer-on-module. The 67.6 x 51.6mm VAR-SOM-MX8X runs Yocto Project based Linux or Android on NXP’s dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 based, 1.2GHz i.MX8X. The up to -40 to 85°C tolerant module is aimed at industrial automation and control, defense, medical, telematics, building control, failover displays/HMI, and robotics applications. The only other i.MX8X module we’ve seen is Phytec’s Linux-compatible, 55 x 40mm phyCORE-i.MX 8X module. Read more

today's leftovers

  • freenode #live 2018 - Doc Searls and Simon Phipps - In Conversation
  • How to edit themes in Linux Mint Cinnamon - Tutorial
  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 17th, 2018
    Thank you to everyone who participated last Bug Day! We had a turnout of about six people, who worked through about half of the existing REPORTED (unconfirmed) Konsole bugs. Lots of good discussion occurred on #kde-bugs as well, thank you for joining the channel and being part of the team! We will be holding a Bug Day on November 17th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!
  • Omarine 5.3 released! (Nov 14 2018)
    This release updates dbus and glib together with all dependencies and related packages. Some of them are rebuilt, the rest are upgraded. Glib 2.58.1 can be considered a development threshold because many dependent packages must be caught it up. Below is a list of some typically upgraded packages:
  • Achievement unlocked! I spoke at PythonBrasil[14]
    PythonBrasil is the national Python community conference that happens every year, usually in October, in Brazil. I attended PythonBrasil for the first time in 2016, the year we had started PyLadies Porto Alegre. Back then, we were a very small group and I was the only one to go. It was definitely one of the best experiences I ever had, which, of course, set a very high standard for every single tech event I attended afterwards. Because of the great time I had there, I wanted to bring more and more women from PyLadies Porto Alegre to experience PythonBrasil in the next editions. So, during the PyLadies Porto Alegre 1st birthday party, I encouraged the other women to submit activities to try and to go to the conference that would happen in Belo Horizonte.
  • Browser Based Open Source Image Optimization Tool Squoosh Comes To Google Lab’s Latest Release
    Open source, browser-based image optimization tool Squoosh is Google’s new Chrome Lab release. This new web tool is meant to make web developers work a lot simpler to optimize web pages. Images loading in a website is usually the reason for them to take so long to load and Squoosh helps web developers shrink the image so that it consumes lesser data. Squoosh can downsize, compress, and reformat images. Its purpose is to make web developers’ work less tedious and hence quicker. Google chrome labs made this tool available offline and said it would be handy to have this tool work offline. Squoosh also supports editing image codecs that are not normally available in the browser.
  • VS Code Live Share plugin [Ed: When GNU/Linux sites help Microsoft]
  • Microsoft Releases Open-Source HLSL to GLSL Shader Cross-Compiler [Ed: As above, except this is just openwashing of proprietary DX]
  • Upgrading OpenBSD 6.3 to 6.4 on Vultr
  • iGNUit has a new homepage address
  • gxmessage has a new homepage
  • It Looks Like The Raptor Blackbird Open-Source Motherboard Will Sell For Just Under $900
    Many have been curious to learn more about the Blackbird from Raptor Computing Systems as a lower-cost POWER9, open-source hardware alternative to their higher-end Talos II hardware that we've been recently benchmarking. The possible price has been revealed.  Overnight, Raptor Computing Systems tweeted a straw poll looking to gauge the interest level in "Would you pre-order a Raptor Computing Systems Blackbird system or board this year at a mainboard cost of $875?"
  • C++20 Making Progress On Modules, Memory Model Updates
    This past week was an ISO C++ committee meeting in San Diego, which happened to be their largest meeting ever, and they managed to accomplish a lot in drafting more planned changes around the C++20 language update.