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Watch Desktop Linux Apps (like GIMP) Running on Chrome OS [Video]

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GNU
Linux
Google

Linux fans enthusiastic about Google’s effort to bring desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS owe to themselves to watch the following video.

In it, technology YouTuber Lon Seidman demos the current state of the Crostini project (‘Crostini’ is the codename for the “run desktop and CLI Linux apps on Chrome OS” feature we keep gushing about) on both an Intel Chromebox and an ARM-based Chromebook.

This latter demo, of ARM support, is of particular interest.

I had (wrongly, it turns out) assumed Google would restrict Crostini to running on its higher-end Chromebooks, like the pricey Google Pixelbook and the ‘spensive Samsung Chromebook Plus.

Read more

More of this

  • Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10

    When Google first launched Chrome OS, the operating system was basically a glorified web browser designed to run web apps. Over time Google added support for running some applications offline and built in tools that let you do things like watch videos without an internet connection, making the platform a little more useful.

    A few years ago the company kicked things up a notch by adding support for Android applications, allowing users to choose from millions of apps and games.

    And this year Google started to build support for desktop Linux applications into Chrome OS. Initially the feature was only available for the Google Pixelbook running Chrome OS in the developer channel. But over the past few months Google has added support for a bunch of additional devices… including the Acer Chromebook Tab 10, which is the first Chrome OS tablet to ship without a keyboard.

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