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OSS Leftovers

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  • Indico Enso opens open route to ‘transfer learning’ AI data

    Back to Indico then. The company has produced Enso, an open-source library designed to streamline the benchmarking of embedding and transfer learning methods for a wide variety of natural language processing tasks.

  • Deep Learning Open Source Framework Optimized on Apache Spark*

    To satisfy the increasing demand for a unified platform for big data analytics and deep learning, Intel recently released BigDL. It’s an open source, distributed, deep learning framework for Apache Spark*.

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Annual Report for 2018 Fiscal Year
  • Will Databricks' support for R Studio open the door?

    In the familiar role of the company whose founders start an open source goliath, providers like Databricks risk becoming victims of their own success. In this case, the founders are the ones who created the Spark project; their product or service has it, and so do many frenemies.

    Databricks, the company positions itself as the cloud-based analytics platform that "unifies data science and engineering." It boasts a growing partner ecosystem encompassing almost all the usual suspects among cloud platforms; roughly a dozen software partners spanning data preparation, databases, data science, and visualization tools; plus a range of consulting and training providers.

  • Understanding Microsoft’s Acquisition of GitHub and its effect on the FOSS Community

    Although of all of that, it seems that Microsoft still holds the hate given to it from the open source community. Following the announcement, thousands of users were screaming on Reddit, Twitter and all other online platforms about what’s going on...

  • LLVM Clang Now Supports -mcpu=native On 64-bit ARM

    For those compiling code on AArch64 (64-bit ARM) systems with LLVM Clang and tuning for your particular SoC, the Clang compiler now supports -mcpu=native.

  • DEAL and Elsevier negotiations: Elsevier demands unacceptable for the academic community

    “The excessive demands put forward by Elsevier have left us with no choice but to suspend negotiations between the publisher and the DEAL project set up by the Alliance of Science Organisations in Germany.” That was the verdict of the lead negotiator and spokesperson for the DEAL Project Steering Committee, Prof Dr Horst Hippler, the President of the German Rectors’ Conference, speaking in Bonn, where the last discussion took place this week.

    “As far as we’re concerned, the aim of the ongoing negotiations with the three biggest academic publishers is to develop a future-oriented model for the publishing and reading of scientific literature. What we want is to bring an end to the pricing trend for academic journals that has the potential to prove disastrous for libraries as it stands. We are also working to promote open access, with a view to essentially making the results of publicly funded research freely accessible. The publishers should play a crucial role in achieving this. We have our sights set on a sustainable publish and read model, which means fair payment for publication and unrestricted availability for readers afterwards. Elsevier, however, is still not willing to offer a deal in the form of a nationwide agreement in Germany that responds to the needs of the academic community in line with the principles of open access and that is financially sustainable,” said Hippler.

  • 16:Pandas Python Data Analysis Library has released v0.23.3 final

    Pandas is an open source library for the Python programming language which provides data structures and data analysis tools. This is a sponsored project by NumFOCUS. It is interesting to visit NumFOCUS to know more about sponsored projects.

    This is a small bug-fix with build issue for python 3.7 which is latest version of python and was released few weeks ago only. Thanks to pandas team for excellent work to resolve the issue in single day and release done on saturday.

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  • NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Adds New KHR_driver_properties & KHR_shader_atomic_int64
    Not to be confused with the new NVIDIA Linux/Windows drivers that should be out today for RTX 2070/2080 "Turing" support and also initial RTX ray-tracing support, there is also out a new Vulkan beta driver this morning. The NVIDIA 396.54.06 driver is this new Vulkan beta and as implied by the version number is still on the current stable branch and not in the Turing era. But this driver release is quite exciting as it does bring support for two new extensions... These extensions are very fresh and not yet in the official Vulkan specification: VK_KHR_driver_properties and VK_KHR_shader_atomic_int64.
  • GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks Coming Today, NVIDIA Driver Bringing Vulkan RTX
    NVIDIA's review/performance embargo has now lifted on the GeForce RTX 2080 series ahead of the cards shipping tomorrow. I should have out initial Linux benchmarks later today, assuming Linux driver availability. As wrote about yesterday, just yesterday I ended up receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti for Linux benchmarking. But, unfortunately, no Linux driver yet... But I am told it will be posted publicly soon with the Windows driver. Assuming that happens within the hours ahead, I'll still have initial RTX 2080 Ti benchmarks on Ubuntu Linux out by today's end -- thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and recently wrapping up other NVIDIA/AMD GPU comparison tests on the current drivers.
  • Intel's New Iris Gallium3D Driver Picks Up Experimental Icelake Bits, GL Features
    One of the talks we are most interested in at XDC2018 is on the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver we discovered last month was in development. We stumbled across the Iris Gallium3D driver that's been in development for months as a potential replacement to their "i965" classic Mesa driver. But they haven't really detailed their intentions in full, but we should learn more next week. This is particularly exciting the prospects of an official Intel Gallium3D driver as the company is also expected to introduce their discrete GPUs beginning in 2020 and this new driver could be part of that plan.