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today's leftovers

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  • Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstations with Ubuntu Preinstalled Now Available, Linux Ultimate Gamers Edition Launched Its 5.8 ISO, Feral's GameMode Coming Soon to Fedora, CentOS 6.10 Released, Security Upgrades for Ubuntu and More

    The Mobile Workstations are powered by the latest Intel Core or Xeon processors, and "feature blazing-fast RAM, professional AMD or Nvidia graphics cards, and are certified for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system". Prices for the "world's most powerful 15" and 17" laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed" begin at $1,091.14 for the 7530 and $1,371.37 for the 7730.

  • Meet the founder of Linux Weekly News

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report.

  • RandR Lease Support Appears Ready For AMDGPU X.Org Driver

    RADEON --
    Keith Packard doing his contract work for Valve to improve the Linux display infrastructure for VR head-mounted displays has been wrapping up his efforts with recently landing the Vulkan bits into Mesa and now the necessary xf86-video-amdgpu patches also are set to be merged there in the days ahead.

    The bits touching the xf86-video-amdgpu X.Org driver are for handling RandR lease support. The CRTC/output leases are handled through the modesetting DDX and is for allowing the SteamVR compositor (or other compositors) to have exclusive access to the display/output of the VR HMD without the conventional desktop compositors getting in the way. As part of the xf86-video-amdgpu patches is also the tracking of "non-desktop" properties such as is currently quirked in the kernel for the HTC Vive VR headset so it won't be setup as a conventional desktop output.

  • Best Easy To Use Linux Firewalls

    Have you ever wondered whether Linux is strong enough to secure your system? This is a frequently asked question especially for those starting out with Linux. The answer is yes. But the second consideration here narrows down to, what is your experience level with Linux if you can configure some of its firewalls or just the capability to use these firewalls which sometimes can be a nut to crack.

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  • How to Run Windows Apps on Android with Wine

    Wine (on Linux, not the one you drink) is a free and open-source compatibility layer for running Windows programs on Unix-like operating systems. Begun in 1993, it could run a wide variety of Windows programs on Linux and macOS, although sometimes with modification. Now the Wine Project has rolled out version 3.0 which is compatible with your Android devices.

  • The latest Humble Monthly has The Escapists 2 and new games in the Humble Trove

    For those looking for some extra games to pass the time during the hot summer months, the new Humble Monthly once again has some Linux offerings.

  • GSoC :: Coding Period – Phase One (June 13th to July 7th): Font color implementation in Poppler and Okular

    As per the agreed timeline, I have patched the poppler-qt5 with the font color by introducing the ‘rg’ operator in the GooString which formats the font color in the RGB color model. The signature of setTextFont function is changed to pass both the QFont and the QColor arguments. In Okular, the font color chooser is introduced in the typewriter annotation setting dialogue which sets both the text annotation’s color and the engine color and hence colorize the typewriter icon color accordingly. The generator side and the doctype XML metadata for saving text color are also adapted. It is well supported in PagePainter too. The review comments (if any) from my mentor, Tobias Deiminger, is yet to come.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Is Approaching With DNF/RPM4, KDE Plasma 5.13, Linux 4.17~4.18

    It has been nearly two years since the debut of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, but fortunately it's soon going to be succeeded by OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • [Slackware] June/July Updates

    It's been a month since my last post about SBo DMCA Takedown, and i wanted to share some updates in the Slackware development progress. It has been an amazing progress and most of my wishlist (from one year ago) have been realized, while two remaining.

    The recent upgrade in Slackware brought GCC 8.1, the latest major release of GNU C Compiler. It brings new language features as well as better code optimizations, BUT it also comes with a stricter rules (which might affects scripts in the SBo projects). Amazingly Pat has stated that all packages have been tested for build failures against this new version of compiler.

  • AWS, HPE, Red Hat on 8 secrets of customer success with your SaaS vendor
  • Will you bet on these, Brighthouse Financial, Inc. (BHF), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • In which scenario Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Associated Banc-Corp (ASB) are Trading Now?
  • Snooping passwords from literally hot keys, China's AK-47 laser, malware, and more

    Canonical has issued a rash of new security patches for its Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution – updates that should be installed as soon as possible.

    Not all of these fixes are alike. If you're running a system with an AMD processor, one patch removes an earlier update that was supposed to address the Spectre CPU vulnerability. That microcode-level mitigation left some AMD-powered systems unable to boot, and now has been given the boot from Ubuntu Linux computers.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel: EROFS, Heterogeneous Memory Management, Getting Involved, 4.20-rc3, and DRM ('Secure Output Protocol')

  • There Is Finally A User-Space Utility To Make EROFS Linux File-Systems
    Back when Huawei introduced the EROFS Linux file-system earlier this year, there wasn't any open-source user-space utility for actually making EROFS file-systems. Even when EROFS was merged into the mainline tree, the user-space utility was still non-existent but now that issue has been rectified.
  • The State Of Heterogeneous Memory Management At The End Of 2018
    Heterogeneous Memory Management is the effort going on for more than four years that was finally merged to the mainline Linux kernel last year but is still working on adding additional features and improvements. HMM is what allows for allowing the mirroring of process address spaces, system memory to be transparently used by any device process, and other functionality for GPU computing as well as other device/driver purposes. Jerome Glisse at Red Hat who has spearheaded Heterogeneous Memory Management from the start presented at last week's Linux Plumbers Conference on this unified memory solution.
  • An attempt to create a local Kernel community
    Now I am close to complete one year of Linux Kernel, and one question still bugs me: why does it have to be so hard for someone in a similar condition to become part of this world? I realized that I had great support from many people (especially from my sweet and calm wife) and I also pushed myself very hard. Now, I feel that it is time to start giving back something to society; as a result, I began to promote some small events about free software in the university and the city I live. However, my main project related to this started around two months ago with six undergraduate students at the University of Sao Paulo, IME [3]. My plan is simple: train all of these six students to contribute to the Linux Kernel with the intention to help them to create a local group of Kernel developers. I am excited about this project! I noticed that within a few weeks of mentoring the students they already learned lots of things, and in a few days, they will send out their contributions to the Kernel. I want to write a new post about that in December 2018, reporting the results of this new tiny project and the summary of this one year of Linux Kernel. See you soon :)
  • Feral Interactive Announces Total War: WARHAMMER II to Be Released for Linux Tomorrow, Uber Joined The Linux Foundation, Security Bug Discovered in Instagram, Fedora Taking Submissions for Supplemental Wallpapers and Kernel 4.20-rc3 Is Out
    Linux kernel 4.20-rc3 is out. Linus says the only unusual thing was his travel and that the changes "are pretty tiny".
  • Wayland Secure Output Protocol Proposed For Upstream - HDCP-Like Behavior
    Collabora developer Scott Anderson sent out a "request for comments" patch series that would add a Secure Output Protocol to the Wayland space. The Secure Output Protocol is for allowing a Wayland client to tell the compositor to only display if it's going to a "secure" output, such as for HDCP-like (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) configurations, but there is no mandate at the protocol level about what is the definition of secure -- if anything. This does not impose any DRM per se by Wayland but is mostly intended for set-top-boxes and other closed systems where a Wayland client can reasonably trust the compositor. The Wayland Secure Output Protocol is based upon the work done by Google on their Chromium Wayland code.

more of today's howtos

Best Linux Desktop Environments: Strong and Stable

A desktop environment is a collection of disparate components that integrate together. They bundle these components to provide a common graphical user interface with elements such as icons, toolbars, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. Additionally, most desktop environments include a set of integrated applications and utilities. Desktop environments (now abbreviated as DE) provide their own window manager, system software that controls the placement and appearance of windows within a windowing system. They also provide a file manager which organizes, lists, and locates files and directories. Other aspects include a background provider, a panel to provide a menu and display information, as well as a setting/configuration manager to customize the environment. Ultimately, a DE is a piece of software. While they are more complicated than most other types of software, they are installed in the same way. Read more

KDE neon upgrade - From 16.04 to 18.04

I am quite happy with the KDE neon upgrade, going from the 16.04 to the 18.04 base. I think it's good on several levels, including improved hardware support and even slightly better performance. Plus there were no crashes or regressions of any kind, always a bonus. This means that neon users now have a fresh span of time to enjoy their non-distro distro, even though it's not really committing to any hard dates, so the LTS is also only sort of LTS in that sense. It's quite metaphysical. On a slightly more serious note, this upgrade was a good, positive experience. I semi-accidentally tried to ruin it, but the system recovered remarkably, the post-upgrade results are all sweet, and you have a beautiful, fast Plasma desktop, replete with applications and dope looks and whatnot. I'm happy, and we shall bottle that emotion for when the need arises, and in the Linux world it does happen often, I shall have an elixir of rejuvenation to sip upon. KDE neon, a surprisingly refined non-distro distro. Read more