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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat Reinforces Commitment to Asia Pacific Partner Ecosystem
  • Which Stock will you hold for a while, Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) or Chubb Limited (CB)
  • The Strategy to Trade Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2018

    This month I accepted 166 packages and rejected only 7 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 216.

  • Coffee Lake module features shock and vibration resistance

    Adlink’s rugged “Express CF/CFE” COM Express Basic Type 6 integrates an 8th Gen Core or Xeon chip with up to 48GB RAM and loads of SATA, USB 3.1, and PCIe. There’s also a carrier board with a Live Linux USB stick.

  • How To Send SMS From Your PC Using Android Messages?
  • Google patents new AI-driven fitness feature for its Wear OS platform

    There's not much happening in the wearables market right now but that doesn't mean companies aren't working on something behind the scenes. A new patent by Google was unearthed giving us a sneak peek of what the tech giant is preparing for its future Wear OS release.

  • Using Android without Google: A (Kind of) Guide

    If you’re interested in using Android but don’t want all the Googly-ness of it, there are ways to go completely Google-free. With the right set of tools, you can have a truly open Android experience.

  • Reply: open data is 'intellectual infrastructure'

    According to Jason Hill, Executive Partner from Reply, open data is as it sounds – open and accessible data that is available to anyone.

    Hill further states that open data must be interoperable so it can be shared, adapted and reused with other datasets.

  • Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18

    If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

  • My First Clang Bug

    Part of the role of being a packager is compiling lots (and lots) of packages. That means compiling lots of code from interesting places and in a variety of styles. In my opinion, being a good packager also means providing feedback to upstream when things are bad. That means filing upstream bugs when possible, and upstreaming patches.

    One of the “exciting” moments in packaging is when tools change. So each and every major CMake update is an exercise in recompiling 2400 or more packages and adjusting bits and pieces. When a software project was last released in 2013, adjusting it to modern tools can become quite a chore (e.g. Squid Report Generator). CMake is excellent for maintaining backwards compatibility, generally accomodating old software with new policies. The most recent 3.12 release candidate had three issues filed from the FreeBSD side, all from fallout with older software.  I consider the hours put into good bug reports, part of being a good citizen of the Free Software world.

  • WordPress 4.9.7 Update Fixes a Pair of Security Vulnerabilities

    WordPress 4.9.7 was released on July 5, providing users of the popular open-source content management system with patches for a pair of security vulnerabilities.

    The security vulnerabilities are both arbitrary file deletion issues that could expose WordPress sites to risk. The first issue was publicly reported on June 26, by researchers at RIPS Tech, while the second was discovered by WordPress security firm WordFence on July 2. In addition to the two vulnerabilities, WordPress 4.9.7 provides fixes for 17 other bugs to help improve stability.

  • Keyboard Attack “Thermanator” Steals Your Passwords Using Body Heat [Ed: Likely BS. Here's why: 1) body might not be warm enough. 2) need big equipment. 3) don't know order of strokes. 4) already have physical access anyway. 5) more keystrokes after password entry.]

More in Tux Machines

Andrew Crouthamel: How I Got Involved in KDE

Since this blog is starting after the beginning of my contributions to KDE, the first few regular posts will be explaining my prior contributions, before moving into the present. Read more

Security: Debian LTS, Linux Potential Local Privilege Escalation Bug, Australia Wants to Mandate Back Doors, Equifax Breach the Fault of Equifax

Graphics: NVIDIA and Gallium3D

  • NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Adds New KHR_driver_properties & KHR_shader_atomic_int64
    Not to be confused with the new NVIDIA Linux/Windows drivers that should be out today for RTX 2070/2080 "Turing" support and also initial RTX ray-tracing support, there is also out a new Vulkan beta driver this morning. The NVIDIA 396.54.06 driver is this new Vulkan beta and as implied by the version number is still on the current stable branch and not in the Turing era. But this driver release is quite exciting as it does bring support for two new extensions... These extensions are very fresh and not yet in the official Vulkan specification: VK_KHR_driver_properties and VK_KHR_shader_atomic_int64.
  • GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks Coming Today, NVIDIA Driver Bringing Vulkan RTX
    NVIDIA's review/performance embargo has now lifted on the GeForce RTX 2080 series ahead of the cards shipping tomorrow. I should have out initial Linux benchmarks later today, assuming Linux driver availability. As wrote about yesterday, just yesterday I ended up receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti for Linux benchmarking. But, unfortunately, no Linux driver yet... But I am told it will be posted publicly soon with the Windows driver. Assuming that happens within the hours ahead, I'll still have initial RTX 2080 Ti benchmarks on Ubuntu Linux out by today's end -- thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and recently wrapping up other NVIDIA/AMD GPU comparison tests on the current drivers.
  • Intel's New Iris Gallium3D Driver Picks Up Experimental Icelake Bits, GL Features
    One of the talks we are most interested in at XDC2018 is on the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver we discovered last month was in development. We stumbled across the Iris Gallium3D driver that's been in development for months as a potential replacement to their "i965" classic Mesa driver. But they haven't really detailed their intentions in full, but we should learn more next week. This is particularly exciting the prospects of an official Intel Gallium3D driver as the company is also expected to introduce their discrete GPUs beginning in 2020 and this new driver could be part of that plan.

Survey: Console Based Linux File Managers

The term ‘file management functions’ refers to the functions used to manage files, such as creating, deleting, opening, closing, reading from, and writing to files. In the field of system administration, Linux has bags of graphical file managers. However, some users prefer managing files from the shell, finding it the quickest way to navigate the file system and perform file operations. This is, in part, because console based file managers are more keyboard friendly, enabling users to perform file operations without using a mouse, and make it quicker to navigate the filesystem and issue commands in the console at the same time. A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator. Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces. Read more