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GNOME Desktop/GTK: fwupdate, LVFS and More

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GNOME
  • fwupdate is {nearly} dead; long live fwupd

    If the title confuses you, you’re not the only one that’s been confused with the fwupdate and fwupd project names. The latter used the shared library of the former to schedule UEFI updates, with the former also providing the fwup.efi secure-boot signed binary that actually runs the capsule update for the latter.

  • Affiliated Vendors on the LVFS

    We’ve just about to deploy another feature to the LVFS that might be interesting to some of you.

    [...]

    The LVFS administrator can now mark other vendors as “affiliates” of other vendors. This gives the ODM permission to upload firmware that is “owned” by the OEM on the LVFS, and that appears in the OEM embargo metadata. The OEM QA team is also able to edit the update description, move the firmware to testing and stable (or delete it entirely) as required. The ODM vendor account also doesn’t have to appear in the search results or the vendor table, making it hidden to all users except OEMs.

  • Felipe Borges: Attending GUADEC!
  • Flatpak in detail, part 3

    The previous in this series looked at runtimes and filesystem organization. Here, we’ll take a look at the flatpak sandbox and explore how the world looks to a running flatpak app.

    [...]

    But how does GTK+ find out that is being used inside a sandbox?

    It looks for a file called .flatpak-info which flatpak places in the filesystem root of every sandbox. This file is not just a marker, it contains some useful information about the details of the sandbox setup, and is worth looking at. Some apps show information from here in their about dialog.

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