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Programming With Python (LWN)

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  • Unplugging old batteries

    Python is famous for being a "batteries included" language—its standard library provides a versatile set of modules with the language—but there may be times when some of those batteries have reached their end of life. At the 2018 Python Language Summit, Christian Heimes wanted to suggest a few batteries that may have outlived their usefulness and to discuss how the process of retiring standard library modules should work.

    The "batteries included" phrase for Python came from the now-withdrawn PEP 206 in 2006. That PEP argued that having a rich standard library was an advantage for the language since users did not need to download lots of other modules to get real work done. That argument still holds, but there are some modules that are showing their age and should, perhaps, be unplugged and retired from the standard library.

  • Advanced computing with IPython

    If you use Python, there's a good chance you have heard of IPython, which provides an enhanced read-eval-print loop (REPL) for Python. But there is more to IPython than just a more convenient REPL. Today's IPython comes with integrated libraries that turn it into an assistant for several advanced computing tasks. We will look at two of those tasks, using multiple languages and distributed computing, in this article.

    IPython offers convenient access to documentation, integration with matplotlib, persistent history, and many other features that greatly ease interactive work with Python. IPython also comes with a collection of "magic" commands that alter the effect of single lines or blocks of code; for example, you can time your code simply by typing %%time at the prompt before entering your Python statements. All of these features also work when using the Jupyter notebook with the IPython kernel, so you can freely switch between the terminal and the browser-based interface while using the same commands.

More Python

An introduction to the Tornado Python web app framework

  • An introduction to the Tornado Python web app framework

    Now let's look at a somewhat different option: the Tornado framework. Tornado is, for the most part, as bare-bones as Flask, but with a major difference: Tornado is built specifically to handle asynchronous processes. That special sauce isn't terribly useful in the app we're building in this series, but we'll see where we can use it and how it works in a more general situation.

    Let's continue the pattern we set in the first two articles and start by tackling the setup and config.

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