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Openwashing and Entryism by Facebook and Microsoft

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Microsoft
OSS
  • Facebook releases Sonar debugging tool to the open source community
  • Facebook open sources Sonar

    Facebook has announced it will be open sourcing its extensible debugging tool: Sonar. Sonar was originally created to help Facebook engineers manage the complexity of working with multiple different modules.

    According to the company, Sonar provides a framework where experts and developers can convey important information to users. It also provides engineers with an intuitive way for inspecting and understanding the structure and behavior of iOS and Android applications.

    When it was started three years ago, Sonar was built upon Stetho, which is an Android debugging bridge built in Chrome’s developer tools. It added new features, provided a richer user experience, and works across both iOS and Android. Facebook recommends the use of Sonar over Stetho for most use cases going forward.

  • Linux Foundation: Microsoft buying GitHub is 'good news' for open source, here's why [Ed: Maybe Zemlin will get a Microsoft job one day.]
  • Closed Source and Ethics: Good, Bad, Or Ugly? [iophk: "Jono is sure milking his earlier accidental appointment as Canonical's spinmeister to promote Microsoft."]

    A little while ago I had a discussion with someone who was grumbling about Microsoft. After poking around his opinion, what shook out was that his real issue was not with Microsoft’s open source work (he was supportive of this), but it was with the fact that they still produce proprietary software and use software patents in departments such as Windows and Office.

    Put bluntly, he believed Microsoft are ethically unfit as a company because of these reasons, and these reasons were significant enough to diminish their open source work almost entirely.

  • Why You Should Use Windows Subsystem for Linux [Ed: Microsoft-connected site says, as in this case, something along the lines of use GNU/Linux only as an 'app' for Vista 10]
  • What Microsoft's GitHub Deal Promises to Programmers [Ed: "Business Over Religion" says a section as if software freedom is superstition and we should submit to the business objectives of Microsoft]
  • Proposed Microsoft-GitHub buy confirms open source role in cloud [Ed: "Microsoft has not always been about the developer," it says. It still isn't. This it why it bribes officials, blackmails executives, lies  and cheats (to this date). Don't believe the PR campaign.]

More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more